3 added 119 characters in body
source | link

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection because Tolkien--Tolkien was a very fine scholar and linguist, and almost certainly knew the classical material inside and out, and nothing. Nothing in Tolkien isseems to be random.

Transmogrifying these precedents into a race of chthonic nemeses to the Dwarves and Elves certainly seems to be an innovation of Tolkien's, and rings sufficiently true (poetic truth) to have influenced a major swathe of modern fantasy, where Tolkien's conception becomes formalized through Dungeons & Dragons and many subsequent fantasy writers.

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection because Tolkien was a very fine scholar and linguist, and almost certainly knew the classical material inside and out, and nothing in Tolkien is random.

Transmogrifying these precedents into a race of chthonic nemeses to the Dwarves and Elves certainly seems to be an innovation of Tolkien's, and rings sufficiently true (poetic truth) to have influenced a major swathe of modern fantasy, where Tolkien's conception becomes formalized through Dungeons & Dragons and many subsequent fantasy writers.

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection--Tolkien was a very fine scholar and linguist, and almost certainly knew the classical material inside and out. Nothing in Tolkien seems to be random.

Transmogrifying these precedents into a race of chthonic nemeses to the Dwarves and Elves certainly seems to be an innovation of Tolkien's, and rings sufficiently true (poetic truth) to have influenced a major swathe of modern fantasy, where Tolkien's conception becomes formalized through Dungeons & Dragons and many subsequent fantasy writers.

2 added 119 characters in body
source | link

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection because Tolkien was a very fine scholar and linguist, and almost certainly knew the classical material inside and out, and nothing in Tolkien is random.

Transmogrifying these precedents into a race of chthonic nemeses to the Dwarves and Elves certainly seems to be an innovation of Tolkien's, and rings sufficiently true (poetic truth) to have influenced a major swathe of modern fantasy, where Tolkien's conception becomes formalized through Dungeons & Dragons and many subsequent fantasy writers.

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection.

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection because Tolkien was a very fine scholar and linguist, and almost certainly knew the classical material inside and out, and nothing in Tolkien is random.

Transmogrifying these precedents into a race of chthonic nemeses to the Dwarves and Elves certainly seems to be an innovation of Tolkien's, and rings sufficiently true (poetic truth) to have influenced a major swathe of modern fantasy, where Tolkien's conception becomes formalized through Dungeons & Dragons and many subsequent fantasy writers.

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source | link

Blake came before Tolkien, and Tolkien definitely knew the work of Blake.

In Blake's mythology, Orc is a fallen entity who embodies rebellion, and opposes the forces of order and tradition, represented by Urizen.
See: America, A Prophecy

I'm going to have to revisit Orcus from Roman Mythology, and will append this answer when I do, but I'd be surprised if there wasn't a connection.