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Accuracy of How accurate is the depiction of the Jade Emperor in "Journey to the West"?

In the 16th-century chineseChinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on the said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
The

The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered. This depiction seems peculiar to me: one would expect the ruler of Heaven to show some temperance, leniency and humility, and the Heaven that the Immortals longed for to be a little more relaxing.

Additionally, the powers of the Jade Emperor seems to be purely (as for a human emperor) its authority. When he decides to stop Sun Wukong he has to send an army after him. When Sun Wukong wrecks the Peach Banquet, he has to order an investigation to know what happens, etc.

This contrasts a lot with the depiction of the Buddha in the book, who managemanages to trick Sun Wukong to be trapped under his hand, that he then transforms into a mountain. This contrast leadleads me to think that maybe the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven is biased.

Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chineseChinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but how far does the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven deviate from the canonical chineseChinese mythology?

Accuracy of the depiction of the Jade Emperor in "Journey to the West"

In the 16th-century chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered. This depiction seems peculiar to me: one would expect the ruler of Heaven to show some temperance, leniency and humility, and the Heaven that the Immortals longed for to be a little more relaxing.

Additionally, the powers of the Jade Emperor seems to be purely (as for a human emperor) its authority. When he decides to stop Sun Wukong he has to send an army after him. When Sun Wukong wrecks the Peach Banquet, he has to order an investigation to know what happens, etc.

This contrasts a lot with the depiction of the Buddha in the book, who manage to trick Sun Wukong to be trapped under his hand, that he then transforms into a mountain. This contrast lead me to think that maybe the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven is biased.

Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but how far does the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven deviate from the canonical chinese mythology?

How accurate is the depiction of the Jade Emperor in "Journey to the West"?

In the 16th-century Chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on the said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.

The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered. This depiction seems peculiar to me: one would expect the ruler of Heaven to show some temperance, leniency and humility, and the Heaven that the Immortals longed for to be a little more relaxing.

Additionally, the powers of the Jade Emperor seems to be purely (as for a human emperor) its authority. When he decides to stop Sun Wukong he has to send an army after him. When Sun Wukong wrecks the Peach Banquet, he has to order an investigation to know what happens, etc.

This contrasts a lot with the depiction of the Buddha in the book, who manages to trick Sun Wukong to be trapped under his hand, that he then transforms into a mountain. This contrast leads me to think that maybe the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven is biased.

Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of Chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but how far does the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven deviate from the canonical Chinese mythology?

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In the 16th-century chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
In the book, the Jade Emperor also have an impressive army whose generals are some of the other classic Chinese deities (the list being quite long I will abstain from naming them here). TheThe Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered.

  This depiction seems very peculiar to me: one would expect the ruler of Heaven to show some temperance, leniency and humility, and the Heaven that the Immortals longed for to be a little more relaxing.

Additionally, the powers of the Jade Emperor seems to be purely (in particular it seemsas for a human emperor) its authority. When he decides to lackstop Sun Wukong he has to send an army after him. When Sun Wukong wrecks the Peach Banquet, he has to order an investigation to know what happens, etc.

This contrasts a lot with the depiction of the Buddha in idealism)the book, who manage to trick Sun Wukong to be trapped under his hand, that he then transforms into a mountain.
Now This contrast lead me to think that maybe the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven is biased.

Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but is this particular depiction close to the canonical chinese mythology or is it just a modification the author made to allowhow far does the story arc to make sense (Sun Wukong free spirit thus conflicting withdepiction of the Jade Emperor strict bureaucracy and thus triggering his rebellion)Heaven deviate from the canonical chinese mythology?

In the 16th-century chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
In the book, the Jade Emperor also have an impressive army whose generals are some of the other classic Chinese deities (the list being quite long I will abstain from naming them here). The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered.

  This depiction seems very peculiar to me (in particular it seems to lack in idealism).
Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but is this particular depiction close to the canonical chinese mythology or is it just a modification the author made to allow the story arc to make sense (Sun Wukong free spirit thus conflicting with the Jade Emperor strict bureaucracy and thus triggering his rebellion)?

In the 16th-century chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered. This depiction seems peculiar to me: one would expect the ruler of Heaven to show some temperance, leniency and humility, and the Heaven that the Immortals longed for to be a little more relaxing.

Additionally, the powers of the Jade Emperor seems to be purely (as for a human emperor) its authority. When he decides to stop Sun Wukong he has to send an army after him. When Sun Wukong wrecks the Peach Banquet, he has to order an investigation to know what happens, etc.

This contrasts a lot with the depiction of the Buddha in the book, who manage to trick Sun Wukong to be trapped under his hand, that he then transforms into a mountain. This contrast lead me to think that maybe the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven is biased.

Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but how far does the depiction of the Jade Emperor and his Heaven deviate from the canonical chinese mythology?

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Accuracy of the depiction of the Jade Emperor in "Journey to the West"

In the 16th-century chinese classic Journey to the West by Wu Cheng'en, the Jade Emperor is depicted as ruling over Heavens the way an actual human emperor would rule over a country. Complaints are brought to him and he rules by decrees and ordinances, in a very bureaucratic way. Everyone in Heaven has a specific job to do and need to report on said job to him. Slackers are shown to be punished severely.
In the book, the Jade Emperor also have an impressive army whose generals are some of the other classic Chinese deities (the list being quite long I will abstain from naming them here). The Jade Emperor is also shown to be sometimes proud, inflexible and short-tempered.

This depiction seems very peculiar to me (in particular it seems to lack in idealism).
Now I'm aware that the author veers frequently away from the canon of chinese mythology (even if most of the novel is just a rewriting of classic folkloric tales), but is this particular depiction close to the canonical chinese mythology or is it just a modification the author made to allow the story arc to make sense (Sun Wukong free spirit thus conflicting with the Jade Emperor strict bureaucracy and thus triggering his rebellion)?