2 Edited spelling of greek names and added few references
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I'm pretty convinced that the answer is: they were not absent (or, at least, Greeks did not consider them absent).

First clue, the infamous trick that Peisistratos did in order to gain popularity among Athenians: he found a tall, young, pretty lady, dressed her as Athena and put her on his chariot. They say he pretended he could not see her but, in the end, the result was that he could spread the rumour that Athena herself came to Athens to put he crown on the head of Athens's true ruler.

This story strongly suggests that Athenians of the age thought that it was possible, one day, as they were walking, to see a god or a goddess in front of them.

There are other stories as well, e.g. when in CumaCyme (Asia Minor) the people asked the oracle of Apollo in Didyma about whether they should provide sanctuary to a rebel from Lydia named PaktyesPactyas, there was an intervention from AristodikosAristodicus after which "the voice of the god was heard". (Herodotus, Clio)

Second clue, I've read a few old folk stories of Greece (like the ones collected by N. Politis), stories about fairies and spirits etc. which proved clearly enough that Greeks could actually see supernatural entities until the 1950's (or thought they saw). Some of these stories have a similarity with ancient greek mythology, but we are not discussing this right now. :)

One mention I found about an absent god, is in Lucianus's Timon (I'm not sure if this is the play) where the leading character cries out to Zeus "...unless you're dead, as Cretans believe." (Though some believe that Cretans worshiped Zeus as a ressurecting god.)

I'm pretty convinced that the answer is: they were not absent (or, at least, Greeks did not consider them absent).

First clue, the infamous trick that Peisistratos did in order to gain popularity among Athenians: he found a tall, young, pretty lady, dressed her as Athena and put her on his chariot. They say he pretended he could not see her but, in the end, the result was that he could spread the rumour that Athena herself came to Athens to put he crown on the head of Athens's true ruler.

This story strongly suggests that Athenians of the age thought that it was possible, one day, as they were walking, to see a god or a goddess in front of them.

There are other stories as well, e.g. when in Cuma (Asia Minor) the people asked the oracle of Apollo about whether they should provide sanctuary to a rebel from Lydia named Paktyes, there was an intervention from Aristodikos after which "the voice of the god was heard".

Second clue, I've read a few old folk stories of Greece, stories about fairies and spirits etc. which proved clearly enough that Greeks could actually see supernatural entities until the 1950's (or thought they saw). Some of these stories have a similarity with ancient greek mythology, but we are not discussing this right now. :)

One mention I found about an absent god, is in Lucianus's Timon (I'm not sure if this is the play) where the leading character cries out to Zeus "...unless you're dead, as Cretans believe." (Though some believe that Cretans worshiped Zeus as a ressurecting god.)

I'm pretty convinced that the answer is: they were not absent (or, at least, Greeks did not consider them absent).

First clue, the infamous trick that Peisistratos did in order to gain popularity among Athenians: he found a tall, young, pretty lady, dressed her as Athena and put her on his chariot. They say he pretended he could not see her but, in the end, the result was that he could spread the rumour that Athena herself came to Athens to put he crown on the head of Athens's true ruler.

This story strongly suggests that Athenians of the age thought that it was possible, one day, as they were walking, to see a god or a goddess in front of them.

There are other stories as well, e.g. when in Cyme (Asia Minor) the people asked the oracle of Apollo in Didyma about whether they should provide sanctuary to a rebel from Lydia named Pactyas, there was an intervention from Aristodicus after which "the voice of the god was heard" (Herodotus, Clio)

Second clue, I've read a few old folk stories of Greece (like the ones collected by N. Politis), stories about fairies and spirits etc. which proved clearly enough that Greeks could actually see supernatural entities until the 1950's (or thought they saw). Some of these stories have a similarity with ancient greek mythology, but we are not discussing this right now. :)

One mention I found about an absent god, is in Lucianus's Timon (I'm not sure if this is the play) where the leading character cries out to Zeus "...unless you're dead, as Cretans believe." (Though some believe that Cretans worshiped Zeus as a ressurecting god.)

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I'm pretty convinced that the answer is: they were not absent (or, at least, Greeks did not consider them absent).

First clue, the infamous trick that Peisistratos did in order to gain popularity among Athenians: he found a tall, young, pretty lady, dressed her as Athena and put her on his chariot. They say he pretended he could not see her but, in the end, the result was that he could spread the rumour that Athena herself came to Athens to put he crown on the head of Athens's true ruler.

This story strongly suggests that Athenians of the age thought that it was possible, one day, as they were walking, to see a god or a goddess in front of them.

There are other stories as well, e.g. when in Cuma (Asia Minor) the people asked the oracle of Apollo about whether they should provide sanctuary to a rebel from Lydia named Paktyes, there was an intervention from Aristodikos after which "the voice of the god was heard".

Second clue, I've read a few old folk stories of Greece, stories about fairies and spirits etc. which proved clearly enough that Greeks could actually see supernatural entities until the 1950's (or thought they saw). Some of these stories have a similarity with ancient greek mythology, but we are not discussing this right now. :)

One mention I found about an absent god, is in Lucianus's Timon (I'm not sure if this is the play) where the leading character cries out to Zeus "...unless you're dead, as Cretans believe." (Though some believe that Cretans worshiped Zeus as a ressurecting god.)