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From my exposure to Greek mythology (The Iliad, The Odyssey, etc.) I had always seen/heard the god of the sea, Poseidon, referred to as Earth-Shaker. Zeus was always given other titles such as Zeus Cloud-Gatherer or Zeus Thunderer.

However, in the book Moses and Monotheism (p. 74), Sigmund Freud writes:

Zeus still bears the name of "the Earth-shaker."

This seems incorrect to me, as Earth-Shaker seems to be Poseidon's title, not Zeus's title.

A preliminary google search did not return any results for Zeus being referred to as Earth-Shaker. So did Freud simply make a mistake, and use Poseidon's title for Zeus, or are there actually instances where Zeus is referred to as Earth-Shaker?

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In later (hellenistic) times Zeus tended to monopolize all powers and earthquakes came to be his deed. There is a classic book by AB Cook Zeus: a study in ancient religion, part3 has some 30 pages on "Zeus and eartquakes", eg. p.21:

The same feeling that the failure of the solid ground can be ascribed to no power lower than the highest prompts the Orphic hymn-writer boldly to transfer the epithet seisickthon,' who maketh the land to quake/ from Poseidon5 to Zeus6 and the author of a Sibylline oracle to use the like language of his supreme Deity7. The fact is that, as the centuries went by, Poseidon lost while Zeus gained in religious significance. Earthquakes came to be connected less and less with the former, more and more with the latter.

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In the same chapter "Zeus and the Earthquakes" of Zeus: a study in ancient religion, Vol. III, by Arthur Bernard Cook, quoted by @sand1 in his answer, the author says:

In point of fact, the earliest extant description of an earthquake attributes the phenomenon, naively enough, to the action of Zeus, who nods his head, shakes his hair, and thereby makes the mighty mass of Mount Olympos to tremble.

Indeed, Homer in the Iliad tells us this about Zeus:

The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake.

Homer, Iliad. 1.528

But, as you already mention in your question, Poseidon is called "Shaker of Earth" more than thirty times in the same work.

I wouldn't discard an earlier association between earthquakes and a chthonic Zeus but, during the classic period at least, "the Shaker of Earth" was definitively Poseidon.

Then, as @sand1 mentions in his answer, and quoting again from Zeus, a study in religion:

The fact is that, as the centuries went by, Poseidon lost while Zeus gained in religious significance. Earthquakes came to be connected less and less with the former, more and more with the latter.

The author then mentions a series of earthquakes, with the first examples attributed to Zeus dating from A.D. times.

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