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19

Both flood myths are certainly similar that it is sound to reason that they may have similar origins or one draws from the other. The Noahide flood myth is detailed in Genesis chapters 6 through 9 of the Jewish/Christian Bible. The Ziusudra flood myth is from a single tablet often called Eridu Genesis. Similarities Both floods are brought about by divine ...


16

This idea based on the Sumerian myth known as Enki and Ninhursag (see ANET, pp. 37-41) keeps popping up, especially in popular literature and on the internet. Kramer, however, did give credence to it, as mentioned by the blogger to whom you linked (see Kramer's History Begins at Sumer, pp. 143-44). To make a long story short, the god Enki out of curiosity ...


14

I found an interesting site for comparing names. I can't trace the exact source(s) used for all four names, but the references given for the entire site may prove useful (and impossible to scroll through, admittedly). Adam: Originally from the Hebrew אדם, "'adam", meaning "man". Eve: Originally from the Hebrew חַוָּה, "chawwah", derived from חוה,"chawah", ...


12

First, note that the first known mention of Ask and Embla is in the Völuspá, in the Poetic Edda: Then from the throng | did three come forth, From the home of the gods, | the mighty and gracious; Two without fate | on the land they found, Ask and Embla, | empty of might. Soul they had not, | sense they had not, Heat nor motion, | nor goodly ...


10

The story of Lilith being Adam's first wife can be found in the fifth question of the Alphabet of ben Sirach: "The angels who are in charge of medicine: Snvi, Snsvi, and Smnglof. After God created Adam, who was alone, He said, 'It is not good for man to be alone' (Gen. 2:18). He then created a woman for Adam, from the earth, as He had created Adam himself,...


6

One of the purposes, in regard to Greek mythology, is elevating human dignity, which leads to humanism. In the Trojan war, the gods are portrayed as petty and squabbling, where Hector, in particular, is portrayed as selfless and honorable. The poem begins by invoking the goddess "Sing, Goddess of the..." but is focused on the rage of Achilles, not the ...


6

I fear behind this question lie the translation used... Angels do not overspeak, that said. There is reference of them here and there, but they keep their angelic mouth shut. Genesis 3-23/24 in king James translation 23 Therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken. 24 So he drove out the ...


5

There is no specific myth of the origin of angels in mainstream Christianity or Judaism, but more apocryphal stuff abounds. The closest you'll get in the Bible proper is Psalm 148, where Yahweh creates angels along with all heavenly things "by his command." It's probably as simple as that - no unusual origin like with man, just say it and it is so. It does, ...


5

"Ostern" the german word for Easter actually has the same etymology as the english term (citing the German wiki page): "Das neuhochdeutsche Ostern und das englische Easter haben die gleiche sprachliche Wurzel, zu deren Etymologie es verschiedene Lösungsansätze gibt. Das Herkunftswörterbuch des Duden leitet das Wort vom altgermanischen Austrō > ...


5

Many have said that it comes from the goddess Ishtar, the Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex. I had actually thought that Easter came directly from worship from her, because etymologically speaking, it doesn't seem too far off. But it seems that the goddess Ēostre (or Ostara), the Germanic goddess, is the one that is directly linked to the ...


4

We know that they do, but we do not know how. Take a look here (Isaiah 37:36-38): 36 Then the angel of the Lord went out and put to death a hundred and eighty-five thousand in the Assyrian camp. When the people got up the next morning—there were all the dead bodies! 185000 Assyrian slain by one angel. But how? Sword? Mace? Magic? Thermonuclear weapon?...


4

Apparently, yes. In the Bible there are several instances of fire raining down from the sky or "coming from the presence of" God and falling upon people. Some interpret these as lightning-strikes. For the majority of these, however, I have my doubts as to whether they are actually intended to be occurrences of lightning. More on that below. A few ...


4

For this answer to work you will need the entire story of Job and his struggles, which is why i have included all of Job 1. I like it because it is the first poetic book in the Old Testament of the Christian Bible Basically God and Satan had a bet, as told in the story this man got everything in life he needed/wanted. God was bragging about his servant Job ...


4

The Maori and their tattoos, the Ta Moko and Kiri Tuhi I'll start by saying that the Ta Moko is well represented of course in the Maori folklore and traditions. For the mythology: The legend of Mataora A less historical explanation of the origin of Maori tattoo can be found in the local legend which suggests that ta moko, the Maori tattoo, came ...


3

Buddhism has the belief that nothing lasts forever and therefore basically doesn't believe at least in an eternal after life(which is what I believe you were implying). A passage in the Nirvana Sutra called the “Verse on Impermanence” tells the story of Sessen Doji, who, during his Buddhist practice, was willing to lose his life in order to hear the ...


1

Try Louis Ginzberg's Legends of the Jews. It is a pretty comprehensive collection of such texts. The first four volumes are available online here.


1

A friend of mine wrote to me that this is probably a reference to "Jove" which is another name for the Roman god Jupiter.


1

In Greek Mythology, Zeus is said to have fallen in love with Ganymede, a kouros, per his beauty. Zeus abducts him to serve as his cup bearer in Olympus. The story has strong homosexual implications, but no one judged Zeus over it, which indicates there was no stigma.


1

Homosexuality was practiced by the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as ancient Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians. Although condemned in the the Bible, the Old testament mentions that prostitutes and transvestites practiced their business in the Temple of Solomon at Jerusalem and dedicated the money they earned toward the temple's upkeep. The American ...


1

I find myself agreeing with Arthur George: The connection is indeed tenuous, as to Enki and Ninti being recast as Adam and Eve in the Bible, based on Professor Kramer's suggestion. I have written two books on the subject in 2010, available at Amazon.com on the internet, (1) Eden's Serpent: Its Mesopotamian Origin, and (2) The Garden of Eden Myth: Its Pre-...


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