10

With the preface that I think it's silly upset about mythological accuracy in a TV show: since the Olympic gods neglected to photograph their human pets, we can't really know what Achilles looks like. Nor do the ancient epics give much in the way of physical descriptions. That said, literary sources do describe Achilles as having blonde or reddish-blonde ...


8

The death of Achilles is related in Aethiopis by Arctinus of Miletus in the 8th Century BCE. This is one of the poems the Ancient Greeks collected into an "Epic Cycle" centered around the events of the Trojan War. Like most of the Epic Cycle except Iliad and Odyssey, Aethiopis is mostly lost, except for five lines and second-century CE summary (in Greek) by ...


7

Achilles doesn't actually want to escape his fate. Turning away from the war at its outset is a response to Agamemnon's insult over Briseis. (The Iliad actually begins with this feud, and the major tension is over whether Achilles will ultimately participate in the war.) The reason Achilles seeks his own destruction is that, in his case, his death is the ...


7

Is it possible, rather, to view Achilles as a more dynamic, developing, three-dimensional character? That is, you describe an either/or motivational paradigm, but mightn't it better be described as both/and? Achilles starts from a place of anger (as does Homer: menin is given pride of place, after all), but in the end, especially after meeting Priam, ...


6

You must be referring to the passage in book eight, near verse 75. The passage is rendered as follows in Butler’s translation: “The company then laid their hands upon the good things that were before them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and more especially a matter that was then ...


5

The duel in Book 22 is not the first time Achilles and Hector met on the battlefield. The story of their earlier encounter is told by Achilles himself, a little earlier in Book 9: [346] "Nay, Odysseus, together with thee and the other princes let him take thought to ward from the ships consuming fire. Verily full much hath he wrought without mine aid; ...


4

Pride and shame It is put best in book 12, 90-130: BkXXII:1-89 Priam and Hecabe fail to dissuade Hector | poetryintranslation.com Which shows his own thinking on the issue: [bolding mine] But his [Hector's] proud thoughts were troubled: ‘Alas, if I retreat through the gate, to the safety of the wall, Polydamas will not be slow to reproach me, ...


3

In Madeline Miller's Song of Achilles she posits that, after the death of his beloved friend, Achilles is seeking death. This makes sense because the prophecy about Achilles' death was that if he took part in the fighting at Troy, he would die there. Once he enters combat to avenge Patroclus, his fate is sealed. Miller presents his time post-Patroclus as ...


2

Much can be deduced from the story of Odysseus and Diomedes going to Skyros to find Achilles. A man as smart as Odysseus would surely have looked for male characteristics such as an Adam's apple or a deeper voice but such characteristics must have been absent in the apparent females he needed to check out. Odysseus therefore had to resort to the trick of ...


2

According to Homeros' Iliad, Achilles is the most handsome young man in the Greek camp. And he has shiny (reddish) blond hair. Homer, Iliad. 2.673–674 “Nireus who was the most beautiful man who came to Troy Of the rest of the Danaans, after Peleus’ blameless son. But he was weak and a small army followed him.” Νιρεύς, ὃς κάλλιστος ἀνὴρ ὑπὸ ῎Ιλιον ἦλθε τῶν ...


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