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The Norse mythological texts record three primary places where the dead were perceived to go: Helheim (Old Norse Helheimr, “the home of the goddess Hel“), Valhalla (Old Norse Valhöll, “the hall of the fallen”), and Folkvang (Old Norse Fólkvangr, “the field of the people” or “the field of warriors”). But they're indistinguishable and don't have any major ...


17

Coins (specifically a type called an obol or obolos) were left on the body or placed in the mouths of the dead. The dead give Charon the coin, which shows they have had proper funeral rites and therefore deserve to be transported to Hades. The Aenid by Vergil, Chapter 6 has this to say Why some were ferried o'er, and some refus'd. "Son of Anchises, ...


12

Wikipedia actually has an interesting interpretation: Attempts to explain the symbolism of the rite also must negotiate the illogical placement of the coin in the mouth. The Latin term viaticum makes sense of Charon’s obol as “sustenance for the journey,” and it has been suggested that coins replaced offerings of food for the dead in Roman tradition. ...


9

The poetic Eddas say that Freya chose half of the dead in battle and the other half went to Odin in Valhalla, the Valkyries take the slain only after Freya chooses her half. Odin gave this right to Freya as a sign of friendliness for the Vanir, to end the war between them and the aesir and get their friendship. Freya went on to live with the Aesir in Asgard ...


7

Leaving aside speculation about relative status, start with the fact that there's a lot we don't know about Norse mythology, and there's no central canon that makes everything match up. So, the correct answer would be that we seem to be dealing with attempts to harmonize a number of beliefs about what happens in the afterlife. Also, there is really no reason ...


4

Yes, there are several specifically named characters in this role. Aaron Atsma's website The Theoi Project has a page thereon entitled Elysion [Elysium], detailing the geography (or, actually, different geographies according to the variety of writers from diverse periods in ancient Greek mythography) and citizenship of the Mythic Realm (he has a whole ...


4

The only explanation that comes to mind for me is that the traditional religion and it's methods were not as present anymore during the later ptolemaic years. It might have been an “accident“ rather than having a mythological purpose.


4

The description of Acheron and Styx in Aeneid 6 appears to be fairly clearly based on the somewhat ambiguous Underworld structure supplied by Circe in Homer's Odyssey 10. Other mythography subsequent to Homer likewise appears to take Circe at her word as far as the placement of these chthonic features is concerned. E.g. Plato's interpretation, given in ...


4

One source mentioning the rivers is Book X of the Odyssey: So I spoke, and the beautiful goddess straightway made answer: ‘Son of Laertes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many devices, let there be in thy mind no concern for a pilot to guide thy ship, but set up thy mast, and spread the white sail, and sit thee down; and the breath of the North Wind will ...


4

The Halls of Vallhalla and Folkvangr are not halls of the dead eternal. They are merely training grounds and housing of those deemed worthy by the Vanir and Aesir to defend them at Ragnarok. Where Odin is destined to be swallowed whole by the wolf Fenris. The gods need an army and these places serve merely as a housing of that army.


3

Buddhism and Hinduism believe in many lives, and do have heavens and hells. Naraka (a Hindu hell) Vaikuntha (a Hindu heaven) At a high level, a distinction between these two religions is that in Buddhism, everything is impermanent and therefore illusory (including heaven and hell), as opposed to the Hindu conception of everything as cyclic and eternal. ...


3

If anything early Christianity was well influenced by ancient Jewish culture of the day, including both Jewish laws, traditions, scriptures and mythology. For the most part both the New and Old Testament are rich sources from which Christians draw their doctrine of hell as a place of punishment and the place of demons. This was also influenced a number of ...


3

Why These Persons? Within the story the explanation is that these men, when they were alive in the upper world, conducted their affairs with especial attention to fairness. Minos and Rhadamanthys in particular also established the first laws ever used in Greece. Diodorus Siculus says that Rhadamanthys possessed "great justice", and that Minos "ruled wholly ...


3

I am a member of a practicing and well-established Coven. Though we are eclectic and welcome many paths, our head crone follows the Asatru (Nordic Heathenism) path and has studied it for many years. There's a subtle distinction I'd like to make that my coven was discussing not too long ago, which is that there's nothing suggesting that Valhöll gets the elite ...


3

Valhalla: home of the heros who did not yield, the valiant dead, Eitenjar the first into the fight when ragnarok begins. Folkvangr is where the other "half" goes. This might just be a way of saying there are two types of people in battle. Odin claims the ones who simply love battle for the sake of battle. Where Freyja takes the ones who are done fighting....


3

The Fields of Reeds were a PERFECT version of mortal reed fields. Egyptians who went there were immune to hunger, fatigue, and the temperature. They lived in eternal happiness, while never being bored. Besides, the alternative was nonexistence. Personally, I'd rather work forever than stop existing.


2

The Aztecs seem to have had a comparable afterlife. While some warriors are said to have gone on to paradise, others join Huitzilopochtli, the god of war and human sacrifice, for endless war. From the Wikipedia entry on Huitzilopochtli, citing Michael D. Coe's 2008 monograph, Mexico: From the Olmecs to the Aztecs (published at London by Thames & Hudson, ...


2

An interesting idea adding up to what was said already: Making a little "comparative hells and abysses" attempt: Tracing the idea of the Netherworld from the Epic of Gilgamesh: Humanity or humans were not allowed to enter the Realm of the Divine, most likely they could enjoy their lives, and afterwards joined the realms of the Shades, or Nether-World - ...


2

That's the legend of the Church Grim. They're from English and Scandinavian lore, and they protect cemeteries and churchyards. https://enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1233957 From the website: The Church Grim, Kirk Grim, Kyrkogrim (Swedish) or Kirkonväki (Finnish) is a figure from English and Scandinavian folklore, said to be an attendant spirit, ...


2

I'm afraid there probably isn't one. Growing up with some Native family myself, I gathered "Happy Hunting Ground" was not an actual native term they used, but rather one of those phrases white men use to make fun of them, like "firewater" and "thunder-stick". That's the context I always heard it in. However, there appears to be a legit Wikipedia page for ...


1

well I don't really know more than those couple you listed above but I do know that in norse mythology the viking who died bravely in battle went to valhalla while the unhonorable dead (the people that died of old age and that kind of stuff) went to helheim. in another religion- i don't know which one it is though - there was limbo kind of like the fields of ...


1

My understanding is that the Christian idea of the underworld is more influenced by Greek mythology than Jewish. (In the New Testament, three terms are used for Hell, two Greek: Hades, Tartarus; and one Hebrew: Gehenna.) Christianity itself may be said to be heavily influenced by both Greek Mythology (Dionysus/Persephone: Dying resurrected god; Heracles: ...


1

The Sumerian tradition has a hell with demons. Although this material predates the time of Jesus by millennia, unlike the ancient Greek religion which was contemporaneous, it is surely an influence on the Hebrew side of the equation as Abraham is said to have come from of Ur. The story of Inanna features demons from the underworld. It's harder to find ...


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