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Yes. A really close fit, fulfilling all of your criteria in one narrative is the origin of a Burmese king called Pyusawhti, who is hatched from a dragon's egg and raised by peasants. Pyusawhti has a sister, hatched from a different egg, but who grows up separately from him. [For the whole story, see the section A Dragon Princess and the Kingdoms of Burma ...


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It's the phallic symbolism. In early Greek theatre, there were satyr plays put on where men dressed up in goat like costumes - that is as satyrs - with over-sized phalluses to symbolise their lustful nature. They were seen as low comedy in counter-point to the high tragedy which was the centre-piece of Attic theatre. This is where the notion of satire comes ...


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Leviticus is mentioned as a source on the scapegoat as noted by @Obie 2.0. Then Aaron shall offer the goat on which the lot for the LORD fell, and make it a sin offering. 10"But the goat on which the lot for the scapegoat fell shall be presented alive before the LORD, to make atonement upon it, to send it into the wilderness as the scapegoat. Leviticus ...


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