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13

Apollo didn't have any solar properties in Homeric times, and he and Helios were clearly distinct entities. Helios is extensively discussed in Book XII of the Odyssey, for example. From the 5th century BCE and onwards Helios started to be identified with Apollo. An early reference to the fusion of the two beings can be found in fragment 781 of Euripidis' ...


10

Most accounts that make the distinction agree that it was Artemis who was born first. From Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 21: She [Leto] finally reached Delos and gave birth to Artemis, who thereupon helped her deliver Apollon. Artemis became a practised huntress and remained a virgin. From Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 22: Even in the hour when ...


8

Probably not. According to Apollodorus, [VI. ZEUS CONFIRMS THE DIVINE PRIVILEGES OF HERMES.] And Zeus made Hermes his personal herald and messenger of the gods beneath the earth." It says that Zeus had to make him into his personal herald, and messenger, but there's no way that [II. HERMES STEALS APOLLO'S CATTLE.] Though he was laid out in swaddling-...


6

Most writers ascribe Apollo's trickery to jealousy. This particular version of the Orion myth comes from the poet Istros, as preserved by Hygnius in his De Astronomicon. The original Latin text is as follows: Istrus autem dicit Oriona a Diana esse dilectum et paene factum ut ei nupsisse existimaretur; quod cum Apollo aegre ferret et saepe eam obiurgans ...


6

Your question reminded me of another myth - maybe you mixed up the two? Herodot describes a dialogue between Croesus and Solon on happiness: King Croesus is proud of his riches and considers himself the happiest man in the world. He asks the wise man Solon whether he has seen any other man happier then himself. Solon answers that he knows of King Tellos ...


5

@Bellerophon's answer is popularly believed to be correct. In this case Cassandra was not prophesying the future. Hyginus (Fabulae XCIII) states that "Apollo brought it about that she should not be believed, though she gave true prophecies." ["ob quam rem Apollo fecit ut, cum vera vaticinaretur, fidem non haeret."] However, Hyginus uses the verb "...


5

Yes Apollo is the same god in both Greek and Roman mythology. From Wikipedia The Roman worship of Apollo was adopted from the Greeks. As a quintessentially Greek god, Apollo had no direct Roman equivalent, although later Roman poets often referred to him as Phoebus. A similar question was asked here: Was Apollo the sun god in Augustan Rome?


5

From the Name of a Place In William Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Mythology and Biography the name is spelled Maleates (Μαλεάτης), whose article entry goes on to tell us that it is a surname of Apollo, derived from cape Malea, in the south of Laconia. He had sanctuaries under this name at Sparta and on mount Cynortium. This article from the ...


5

Okay, first of all, Apollo is actually pretty neutral in the beginning of the war, very much like Zeus. It's after Zeus orders him to go get involved that he enters the war. Zeus secretly favored the Trojans, and hence he sent Apollo to help them. Apollo did that. But we can't deny that Apollo did that just because Zeus asked him to. First of all, Apollo ...


4

He showed up It's a fallacy to treat mythology as a consistent narrative with a single continuity. Lots of stories interact and combine, and the fragments that have survived become what we call "mythology". We can get a better handle on this by tracing the references in the Wikipedia article to ancient sources. In some sources, it seems that ...


4

I think you'll find that it's Apollo Clarius (Klarios) that you're looking for. While both names occur on the site Theoi.com, only Clarius has an entry, which makes me think that Clerius may be a misspelling. That it turns up nothing on JSTOR and very few hits on Google seems to confirm this.) Apollo Clarius was an Ionic deity, and appeared on coins from ...


3

The Roman story was that they adopted the god Apollo from the Greeks after a plague in the 430s BCE. According to Wikipedia: On the occasion of a pestilence in the 430s BCE, Apollo's first temple at Rome was established in the Flaminian fields, replacing an older cult site there known as the "Apollinare". During the Second Punic War in 212 BCE, the ...


1

The wiki seems to have been updated: According to the Greek historian Plutarch (in De defectu oraculorum, "The Obsolescence of Oracles"), Pan is the only Greek god who actually dies. I checked the Plutarch source, and found no mention of Asclepius. My sense is that this was an error, in that Greek demi-gods all died, or at least their mortal halves (as ...


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