18

The more popular version of the Talos story can be found in the Argonautica. In it, Talos was an automaton, a self operating machine. He was forged by Hephaistos and was tasked by Zeus to guard Europa's hideout in mount Dikti (in Crete): And Talos, the man of bronze, as he broke off rocks from the hard cliff, stayed them from fastening hawsers to the shore, ...


8

By my reading, the biggest stretch of time that Apollonius Rhodius mentions in his Argonautica as being spent in a single location by his heroes is in Line 1079 of Book 1, where they get stranded on Arktonnesos [Arctonnesus], “Bear Island,” for twelve days and twelve nights before they figure out how to persuade Kybele [Cybele] to let them successfully set ...


7

As usual, if you remove the little-simplified version of the BBC, the story they are talking about is "the Storm God and the serpent". but first: The Hittites The Hittites are an old civilization running through the 2000 BC - 1000 BC period. They are great enough to have stopped Ramses II, potentially the most powerful pharaoh ever [You can find a ...


7

After reading a whole theoi article, it leaves me very confused and with 2 theories. The less likely one. First the bull was sacrificed to the god Ares, and the fleece was put on the holy grove of Ares. An oracle told Aeetes, son of Sol [Helios], that he would keep his kingdom as long as the fleece which Phrixus had dedicated should remain in the ...


5

No. The original myths are based more on ideas of "divine magic" as an explanation for the existence of various characters, rather than scientific logic as we know it today. So the explanation for Talos, to the ancient Greek reader, would have been that he was a bronze statue endowed by the gods with a living soul & they would have considered him a man, ...


4

It is the law for one who is defiled by shedding blood to be barred from speech until he is sprinkled with the blood of a new-born victim by a man who can purify from murder. Long before at other houses I have been thus purified both by victims and by flowing streams. That's Orestes, in Aeschylus Eumenides 448–52, trans. H. W. Smyth. The victims in ...


3

Robert Graves in his scholarly "The Greek Myths" Ch 156 says: "Jason first visited Boeotian Orchomenus, where he hung up the golden fleece in the temple of Laphystian Zeus." I'm not sure what his original source was for this, it's not immediately clear from the text, though there are references which could be followed. This was after Jason left Iolcos and ...


3

Koraki in Greek is κοράκι meaning crow or raven. Noticing other articles on that site the authors name is on top just like the "koraki". It's probably a made up name used to make the story more interesting. I certainly found no other references to Koraki in the ancients texts applicable to this story.


3

It appears to be primarily by someone else ritually bloodying up the murderer's hands. The only place I have found a scene actually describing the ritual of purification from murder in Greek mythology is Book 4, Lines 685-718 of Apollonius Rhodius' Argonautica, in which Medea and Jason are welcomed by Circe upon her island of Aeaea. She seems to know ...


1

Argo The idea of Argo containing a branch of the Dodona Oak comes from the Hellenistic epic Argonautica by Appolonius of Rhodes. In Book 1, the Argonauts are getting in the ship preparing to leave Pagasae in Magnesia, when an astonishing thing happened: And a strange cry did the harbour of Pagasae utter, yea and Pelian Argo herself*, urging them to set ...


1

In Graeco-Roman necromancy (Ogden, Daniel "Graeco-Roman Necromancy" - excellent resource), one could be cleansed of murder by appeasing the victim by making offerings or performing labours for the murderee.


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