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14

I agree that there isn't evidence that Artemis was exclusively a lesbian, and no myth as far as I know that explicitly states that either, but there is was such an implication. In the Callisto myth, Zeus takes on the form of Artemis in order to have sex with Callisto, one of her followers. He does this to "lure her into his embrace". So even though she ...


12

Artemis doesn't seek the company of man, that is true. She is the virgin goddess of the hunt, and she usually is escorted by young virgins. Virginity is linked to purity, and Artemis is one of the symbols of this. She fell in love only one time with Orion. But he was killed by Gaïa because he threatened to kill every beast on the earth in his mad hunt ...


10

Most accounts that make the distinction agree that it was Artemis who was born first. From Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 21: She [Leto] finally reached Delos and gave birth to Artemis, who thereupon helped her deliver Apollon. Artemis became a practised huntress and remained a virgin. From Callimachus, Hymn 3 to Artemis 22: Even in the hour when ...


6

The thing is, the ancient Greeks and Romans simply didn't have categories for "gay" or "lesbian". In modern times, their idea of sexuality is described as "polymorphic perversity", which translates to "whatever feels good" -- men, women, children, animals, whatever. While data on women is sketchy (their doings were beneath notice for most writers), we do ...


6

Most writers ascribe Apollo's trickery to jealousy. This particular version of the Orion myth comes from the poet Istros, as preserved by Hygnius in his De Astronomicon. The original Latin text is as follows: Istrus autem dicit Oriona a Diana esse dilectum et paene factum ut ei nupsisse existimaretur; quod cum Apollo aegre ferret et saepe eam obiurgans ...


5

It is commonly accepted that she was born first and assisted with the birth of her brother Apollo. Two quick sources I pulled off of Theoi: "Of the daughters of Koios . . . Leto had relations with Zeus, for which she was hounded by Hera all over the earth. She finally reached Delos and gave birth to Artemis, who thereupon helped her deliver Apollon. ...


4

The Homeric Hymn to Delian Apollo mentions a goddess of childbirth, Eileithyia, who was delayed by Hera, forcing Artemis to help her mother birth Apollo. (She was his older sister by a minute or two, so she started in early.) Only Eilithyia, goddess of sore travail, had not heard of Leto's trouble, for she sat on the top of Olympus beneath golden ...


4

The scholiast to Apollonius of Rhodes gives the story with Orion, but nothing about Artemis. The scholiast to Pindar Nemean 2.17-18 also gives the story with Orion (along with a lot of non-mythological content). I don't see in either one of them a reference to a connection with Artemis. However, there are sources for this in the scholia, which you have ...


3

Well, it was a temple that just had two separate reasons to be built. Book. Since Poseidon was involved in Athens-Elusis relationship, and Artemis was the Propylaea(1) of Eleusis, so they made one temple to honor both of them. (1) prop·y·lae·um- the entrance to the Acropolis at Athens.


1

Artemis represents the untamed and wild, on the fringe of civilization. Animals are mortal and must die eventually as part of the cycle because humans must eat animals and sometimes animals must eat humans. She hunts because humans must eat but she kills within proscribed limits and boundaries. Her actions support the cosmological order. Orion like Artemis ...


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