37

Arthurian legend is essentially combined from a wide variety of sources, and there doesn't seem to be a definitive answer. The first narrative account is from Geoffrey of Monmouth in Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain), 12th Century. He wrote, in Latin, of a sword called Caliburnus, which was made on the isle of Avalon. Wace wrote ...


22

Many early Celtic legends apply male and female characteristics to geographical features. If you take Mary Caine's works on the areas around the Isle of Avalon, the hills of Glastonbury, then the location of the lake is female. Where the Michael ley line (red male energy) intersects the much shorter Mary ley line (white female energy) at Glastonbury Tor, ...


17

TL;DR: They do indeed! The details vary, but certainly after Geoffrey of Monmouth, it's generally agreed that Mordred was responsible for Arthur's downfall - Arthur killed Mordred, but was mortally wounded in the process. c. 1136: The original account in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Brittaniae, the generally accepted first appearance of Arthur, in ...


15

It's fairly easy to imagine how Caliburn may have migrated linguistically to Excalibur, especially as spelling was not standardised until the end of the 18th Century and copying of manuscripts was a performed by hand. They are indeed two names for the same sword. Roman de Brut has both Caliborne, and Escaliborc in various copies of the document.


15

There are a few different accounts, detailed here: She was the half sister of none other than King Arthur himself, the daughter of King Gorlois and Igraine (Arthur's mother). She was most likely the aunt of Mordred, though one or two accounts give her as his mother. She was one of nine sisters living in the land of Avalon (of course), who had magical, ...


14

Geoffrey's account of Merlin Ambrosius' early life in the Historia Regum Britanniae is based on the story of Ambrosius in the Historia Brittonum. The Historia Regum Britanniae explains that when Merlin died he was "400 Summers his Lord" (His Lord would be Arthur and Arthur died in his 40's to 60's). So we can assume that Merlin was around 440-460 years old. ...


11

Excalibur was returned to the lake from whence it came. Most accounts have it that Sir Bedivere took it there from Camlan. Malory is the only source that I know of that mentions an arm taking the sword. According to the monks of Glastonbury Abbey, it was returned at what is now Pomparles Bridge over the River Brue. Just to the southwest of the Isle of ...


9

It's less of a myth thing and more of terminology. It's not called "volume" because that would imply authorial or official continuity. Same with "part". Volumes and parts assume a whole, but Helie de Boron's work builds off of and even reworks parts of Luce de Gat's version. That makes it a true version and not just a sequel. For a general overview, check ...


9

According to most versions of the myth, the reign has not ended. No version explicitly states how long the physical reign of Arthur lasted. That is almost certainly deliberate, in order to maintain some mysticism. There are no texts that give an age for Arthur or any of the other protagonists at Camlan or after. Malory is the best known source that ...


9

Well, yes and no. Arthurian texts are divided into two groups: pre-Galfridian and Galfridian. The first category is older, dating at least to the Historia Brittonum, written in Wales in the early 9th century. By this point most of Britain had been conquered by the Anglo-Saxons, with the Brittonic people largely pushed into Wales or migrated to Armorica. ...


9

Using any English/Welsh/Anglo, Teutonic, or Romance variant of the legendary names will likely have enough similarities to clue in your players quickly. If you really want to disguise the nature of the names, try their meanings instead. Arthur: Bear Guinevere: White ghost Lancelot du Lac: Land (and his last name means "of the lake") Myrddin, or Merlin: Sea ...


8

Maybe use earlier Welsh forms of the names where possible? Such as Artur/Arthur, Merlin/Myrddin, Gwenhwyfar/Guinevere, Caer Lleon/Camelot?


5

Insofar as the earliest native British traditions go, at least, it doesn't seem so. Looking through some early Welsh texts (Culhwch ac Olwen, Pa Gur, the Trioedd Ynys Prydein, the Beddau stanzas, a couple mentions in poetry), I can't find anything that suggests Bedwyr possessed magical abilities. The closest thing of relevance I saw was in CaO, when Cai ...


4

While not a complete list by any means, these are some unfamiliar name variants I could think of off the top of my head. Generally, all forms of Arthur are too close to the original to fool anyone. The best I can think of is Artair, the Scottish form. Though you could use a Welsh/Old Brythonic name like Arthmael ("bear prince"). Morgana/Morgan le Fay is ...


3

In that same Wikipedia link you provided, it says: Malory dissociates Nimue from the general title of Lady of the Lake, so that when Sir Balin kills (one of) the Ladies of the Lake Nimue can continue to play a pivotal role in the plot. "Lady of the Lake" is merely a title, one that passes to different women throughout the tales of Arthurian Legend, Nimue ...


3

However, it Bernlak's actions here suggest that he is no longer under such a spell, as he voluntarily gives away the information. This observation would be true if Bernlak had been transformed into something other than a human. However, there are scores of Celtic tales wherein the human victims of evil-doers freely tell the "white knight" about their fate ...


2

The chronology of the main Arthurian text ranges from the 6th to the 15th century, the older ones rarely as complete texts. The Myrrdin myths appear for the first time in a rather unrelated way in the 12th century, and then become more intertwined with the Arthurian legends. The main textual sources regarding shapeshifting in this chronology have been marked ...


1

As Gibet pointed out*, The Book of Elaine is just a cutting in the text of the book XVIII, precisely a cut in the middle of the chapter VIII, i.e. page 283 in the 1956 edition. The same way, The Book of Queen's Maying starts in the same place with book XVIII, chapter XXV (How true love is likened to summer), i.e. page 314 in the 1956 edition. ----------- *...


1

The Holy Spirit seems the most likely answer. Geoffrey of Monmouth would have been familiar with the story of Penetecost, in which the Holy Spirit gives the apostles the ability to speak in different languages. St. Peter then preached to the various nationalities assembled in Jerusalem, saying: And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I ...


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