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21

Well, according to Ovid, she din't put Medusa's entire head on the shield, just the snakes from her hair: Jupiter’s daughter turned away, and hid her chaste eyes behind her aegis. So that it might not go unpunished, she changed the Gorgon’s hair to foul snakes. And now, to terrify her enemies, numbing them with fear, the goddess wears the snakes, that she ...


18

There are two possibilities here: Either, Metis was killed when Zeus swallowed her: It may seem odd for Metis to have been pregnant with Athena but, never mentioned as her mother. This is because the classic Greeks believed that children were generated solely from the fathers sperm. The women was thought to be nothing more than a vessel for the ...


17

Those two gods were worshipped differently. Η Αθηνά, η οποία ξεκίνησε ως πάνοπλη Θεά του πολέμου και στη συνέχεια εξελίχθηκε σε πολιούχο Θεά της Αθήνας και σύμβολο της σοφίας, (...) Ο αιμοδιψής Άρης ήταν πολεμικός θεός, ο οποίος εκπροσωπούσε τη μανία και το παράλογο του πολέμου. Athena, who initially was an armed Goddess of War and then became a ...


11

There is no clear explanation on this and opinions seem to vary, some of which are the following: The name comes from a Giant called Πάλλαντας (Pallantas), whom Athena killed during the Titanomachy. Athena got that name because she was born out of Zeus' head by throbbing her spear. The name is attributed to a friend of Athena, whom she killed accidentally,...


8

It's not clear from your picture, but the face is most probably a Gorgoneion, a recurring element of Athena's iconography: In Ancient Greece, the Gorgoneion (Greek: Γοργόνειον) was a special apotropaic amulet showing the Gorgon head, used most famously by the Olympian deities Athena and Zeus: both are said to have worn the gorgoneion as a protective pendant....


7

The Metis story is interesting because according to the prophecy Metis would have two children - Athena and then a son who would ovethrow Zeus. This would have represented a triumph for the Titans, including Metis, over Zeus and his Olympians. So Zeus prevented this next generation from being born by swallowing Metis whole, thus absorbing her wisdom as well. ...


7

Yes and no. It depends on how you look at it. Athena is Zeus' favorite. She is a "daddy's girl" for sure, siding with the father over the mother in the trial of Orestes. He gives her the aegis to make sure she is protected in battle, and the term "aegis" is still used to connote a form patronage or protection. In this light, her wisdom, and her springing ...


6

The word γλαυκῶπις shares its root with γλαύξ, the word for owl. Owls are known for their large and distinctive eyes, which are adapted for low light hunting. Thus, I believe the epithet is a comment on Athena's perceptiveness, telling us that the goddess of wisdom can see even through the dark. You may find more information on Athena's association with ...


5

Ariadne and the Battle of the Brothers In one source, Perseus is supposed to have used Medusa's power at least once after Seriphos. In the last third of the second-last book of his epic, the Dionysiaca, the Egyptian writer Nonnus narrates the conclusion of a tour of Greece taken by the wine-god Dionysus. At the time, Dionysus' half-brother Perseus rules ...


4

As yannis pointed out in the comments, Athena cannot be considered stronger than Poseidon, and you're assuming too much here. Poseidon is one of the most powerful gods, along with his brothers Zeus and Hades. Athena is, don't get me wrong, very powerful, but not in the way Poseidon is. The Greeks knew this, as well. First of all: in some versions of the ...


4

The nature of the aegis depends on what source you're looking at. Euripides suggests that the aegis was the skin of the slain Gorgon, but the Gorgon is commonly held to be a later addition. Diodorus Siculus claims it was the skin of a monster that Athena killed and flayed. The twelfth century Byzantine poet John Tzetzes claims it was the skin of the ...


4

Athena has similarities to the Furies, and they both go back to pre-Classical, Mycenean religion. I'm not sure there's a direct connection between them. Athena is also a virgin deity, born of a mother alone (depending on who you ask), associated with snakes and the underworld (her son through Hephestios is Erikhthonios, who was a snake from the waist down)...


4

Athena probably wouldn't have been turned to stone from Medusa's head since Athena was the one who cursed Medusa to look like that in the first place using her own power. Like if someone tried to use Zeus's thunderbolts against him; I don't think it would work since they are his.


3

Athena never did. There was also an account, stating that Prometheus had created men out of earth and water, at the very beginning of the human race, or after the flood of Deucalion, when Zeus is said to have ordered him and Athena to make men out of the mud, and the winds to breathe life into them (Apollod. i. 7. § 1; Ov. Met. i. 81; Etym. Mag. s. v. ...


3

The currently preferred view of Greek etymologists is that γλαύξ "owl" and the colour-adjective γλαυκός (in Homer the colour of the sea, later generally “grey”) are not etymologically connected. If γλαυκῶπις is connected with the former, then it means "with the eyes of an owl", not "grey-eyed". The owl is Athena’s special animal; she is generally represented ...


3

It depends, as Yannis said, on the translation. Wikipedia says: In Homer's epic works, Athena's most common epithet is Glaukopis (γλαυκῶπις), which usually is translated as, "bright-eyed" or "with gleaming eyes". The word is a combination of glaukós (γλαυκός, meaning "gleaming, silvery", and later, "bluish-green" or "gray") and ṓps (ὤψ, "eye, face"...


3

Before the sack of Troy, Diomedes and Odysseus sneak into Troy and steal the Palladium , a wooden statue of Athena, from her temple. A prophecy stated that Troy could not fall as long as the statue remained. But it's odd that this would anger Athena, who sided with the Greeks during the Trojan War (Paris didn't give her the apple, after all) and the theft ...


2

In the Iliad (Book V) Ares complains to Zeus that he lets Athena - the pestilent maiden - get away with anything: Speedily he came to the abode of the gods, to steep Olympus, and sate him down by the side of Zeus, son of Cronos, grieved at heart, and shewed the immortal blood flowing from the wound, and with wailing spake to him winged words: “Father Zeus, ...


2

There was none It is specifically noted in this passage from wikipedia that there is doubt as to whether the event is canonical mythology or simply a creation of Homer to add literary weight to Achilles pleas with his mother: From the Wikipedia article around the goddess Thetis who is Achilles mother https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thetis Quintus of Smyrna,...


2

I've found at least one case while reading Petrifaction in mythology and fiction in Wikipedia. Iodame, a priestess at the temple of Athena Itonia, daughter of Itonus and granddaughter of Amphictyon, who was turned into stone one night that Athena appeared in front of her. According to Pausanias, in Description of Greece: Iodama, who served the goddess ...


2

Yes. Athena (and Hera) lost the Judgment of Paris to Aphrodite: [E.3.2] For one of these reasons Strife threw an apple as a prize of beauty to be contended for by Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite; and Zeus commanded Hermes to lead them to Alexander on Ida in order to be judged by him. And they promised to give Alexander gifts. Hera said that if she were ...


2

Antithetical to Ares, Athena (equally patron deity of warfare) is slow to anger. She is not impulsive, brash, impudent. She is prudent, indeed wisdom incarnate. She's not born of the carnal impulse. Rather than think of Athena as an aspect of Zeus, it might be more fruitful to consider each deity an anthropomorphic aspect of the human experience. She ...


1

If the word for "grey-eyed" and "owl" share a linguistic history, then the correct translation would be "bright-eyed" since literally it would read, "with the eyes of an owl" which generally fall in the spectrum of yellow or a neighboring color. This would make sense being that the owl is almost always associated with Athene


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