New answers tagged

0

This stems from the worship of Shapash (also called Shapsh, Shapshu or sometimes Shemesh), the Canaanite goddess of the sun. She is not to be confused with the Akkadian sun god, Shamash. In the Epic of Baal, Shapash plays an important part in the plot, as she interacts with all of the main characters, and in the end she is favourable to Baal's position as ...


3

A few possible answers: From a more secular view: Heinrich Zimmern in The Babylonian and the Hebrew Genesis (Originally in German "Biblische und babylonische Urgeschichte"), pg 44-45, wrote: "...We have found in Babylonian traditions the origin of this figure of the sage walking with God through the greater part of a life of three hundred and ...


2

The Ten Commandments contain little that was new to the ancient world and reflect a morality common to the ancient Middle East. In 1901 archeologists uncovered fragments of a copy of the Law Code of King Hammurabi, considered one of the most significant legal documents from antiquity. (Hammurabi was the sixth king of the first dynasty of Babylon, whose ...


1

Nephilim are Enoch's version of the Mesopothamian corpora. Given that Enoch lived in the 3rd century before modern era he had no clue to whom he was referring to: Nephilim are the hebrew language equivalent of the Igigi, the celestial Gods created by the Seven Annuna representing the hypostasis of planets in the Solar System, that centuries later merged into ...


-1

These commandments were originally mentioned and first written down in Exodus 20:2-17, a text written around 600 BME (Before Modern Era) therefore at the time of the 26-th Dynasty of Egypt and is strictly tied with the Hebrew narration of the story which has absolutely no factual presence in other sources. Samaritans are supposedly descendants of Israeli ...


Top 50 recent answers are included