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It certainly seems that the Greek invasion of India led to the introduction of the first statues of the Buddha. The Greeks loved to make statues of their deities, but the early Buddhists did not. See this answer on Buddhism Stack Exchange: Did the Buddha discourage antropomorphic representations of himself? Alexander himself certainly seemed interested in ...


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That's a definite "no" as far as an Egyptian connection is concerned. A much more plausible explanation is that in creating myths, humans follow a limited number of patterns, regardless of their cultural background. This field of study is called Comparative Mythology. This has uncovered a number of parallels, or archetypes, between the myths of ...


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The Dakini connection Here is an extract of Chinese Magical Medicine by Michel Strickmann implying the direct connection between the Inari and the Dakini (p. 272). The “Dakini” or “Dagini” for which this complex of modern Japanese possession-rites is named is, of course, the dakini of older Tantric sources, identified since at least the ...


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The legend behind the severed head of Chhinnamasta is described in the Pranatoshini Tantra text. The story goes as follows: Goddess Parvati was bathing in Mandikini river where she gets sexually excited and as a result, her complexion turns dark. Her two attendants, Dakini and Varnini, ask her for food at the exact same time. The Goddess tries to convince ...


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There are actually Japanese kitsune with 9 tails known as Kyubi no Kitsune. However, not all kitsune have 9. A Kitsune gains its tails about 1 per century, and only attains 9 (Kyu) after 1,000 years. These kitsune are much more powerful than the typical nogitsune/yako of common folklore. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/九尾の狐#Japanese - etymology https://en....


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