12

I'm afraid they do not. It should be noted that even the Hebrew scriptures, probably the only ones I can think of that has a date of creation so closely tied to generations of men, is not really precise, for a generation is not a precise number. However, some ancient Greeks did try to come up with dates for certain mythological events, particularly the ...


9

Yeah, the Italian Wiki page is correct. The reading is: Volturnalia a deo Volturno, cuius feriae tum. Octobri mense Meditrinalia dies dictus a medendo, quod Flaccus flamen Martialis dicebat hoc die solitum vinum novum et vetus libari... I'll use the Loeb translation with some clarifications: [There's also the] Volturnalia, from the god ...


6

Since historians started noted how Christianity attempted to displace paganism, assertions such as Dan Brown's are a commonplace. Older cultures did not have a precise calendar, so Dec. 25th is approximately the winter solstice, a period of a few days when the duration of daylight is minimal and which gets more perceptible in the northern latitudes. The "Day"...


4

In English (and most germanic languages) the days of the week come mainly from gods from the Germanic faiths. Monday = Day of the moon Tuesday = Day of Tyr Wednesday = Day of Wodan/Odin Thursday = Day of Thor Friday = Day of Freya (or perhaps Freyr) Saturday = Day of Saturn (Roman influence) Sunday = Day of the Sun


4

On the Wikipedia page for Halloween Costumes it says: An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585. Looking at the external links on the page I found something that sort of explains this. As the centuries wore on, people began dressing like these dreadful creatures, performing antics in exchange for food and drink. ...


4

No one really knows for sure but the idea is in France in the 1500s New Year's celebrations would start a few days before then end on April 1st. When the date changed to January 1st people who still celebrated on the old date would be made fun of as April fish. A few centuries later people would try to stick a paper fish onto someone's back, without them ...


4

I'm glad you asked this, because this is something I've wondered about for awhile. I think the other answers cover Mithra and Adonis pretty well, so here's what I have been able to find out about Dionysus and Osiris. The rural Dionysia (a Greek festival) was held to celebrate the wine harvest, but it actually took place in the month of Poseidon, which "...


2

Pentacost is the indwelling of the Holy Spirit into the disciples of Christ following the ascension of Jesus Christ into Heaven. It's also the Jewish festival of Shavuoth per the Oxford dictionary. Here's an excellent article tying its roots to Jewish harvest festivals at which time many people became Christians following the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. ...


2

Of all places Malta is the best! Many other countries "celebrate" April Fool's Day, but none like Malta! The story of “April Fools' Day” is one of a certain curiosity indeed! It is known to the French as a “Poisson d'Avril”. To understand how this tradition started, one has to understand two things: the change of the calendar in 1582; and how the people of ...


2

Origin of April Fools' Day or April Fool's Day1: A disputed association between April 1 and foolishness is in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales (1392). ... In 1508, French poet Eloy d'Amerval referred to a poisson d'avril (April fool, literally "April's fish"), possibly the first reference to the celebration in France. ... Some writers ...


2

Short version: the assignment was more astrological than religious, insofar as such things can be separated out. The oldest explanation I can find of the now-standard day names is from Cassius Dio, second century CE, though the names are referenced earlier (Tibullus, first century BCE). Dio claims the system was developed by the Egyptians, but most likely ...


2

ABC News explains it here: In Greece, the pomegranate has held strong symbolic meaning since ancient times. A common tradition on New Year's Eve is to throw pomegranates on the ground, and break them apart. The more they burst, the more abundance your household will have. Crete is in Greece, and so the pomegranate is well known as a sign of abundance. ...


1

According to the article on Easter Rabbits from Wikipedia: Originating among German Lutherans, the "Easter Hare" originally played the role of a judge, [...] the Lutherans being Christian explains the following paragraph The hare was a popular motif in medieval church art. In ancient times, it was widely believed (as by Pliny, Plutarch, Philostratus, ...


1

Well, from what I remember, it was because of the winter solstice, and getting new followers. That's what I remember.... The beginning of the article I'm about to talk about, mentions saturnalia, a roman feast to the god Saturn. Then, there's Sol Invictus and Mithras, which was a feast by Roman Emperor Aurelian. The Mithraists (Mithras) are linked because ...


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