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There still remains much controversy on this question. In fact, there are books written devoted to just this narrative. It's frankly impossible to answer, however, I've outlined some of the theories. On the surface, god prefers blood sacrifices. Surely we must have, at least at some layer, some etiological myth that explains why the ancient Hebrews used ...


22

To oversimplify it, God is too powerful. One twitch of a (metaphorical) muscle, and poof everything is gone. God created everything, the whole universe, including the dragon (devil/Satan) and demons. Furthermore, He sustains the existence of everything (Hebrews 1:3) , so He has the upper hand in this war, to put it mildly. Throughout the Bible, it is clear ...


20

It is typically assumed that when similarities are found between Christianity and another religion, whether in myth, dogma, or practice, the flow of influence is syncretism into Christianity. This tendency is largely due to the many instances of Catholic hagiology (mythology about the Saints) appearing much like myths from earlier pagan times before ...


20

Adam and Eve had many other unnamed sons and daughters besides Seth, Kain and Abel (Gen. 5:4). Marriage to a sister in the early stage of the human race was not considere wrong or unnatural. Even later on Abraham’s wife was his half-sister (20:12); also 24:4 and 28:2. God did not prohibit such marriages until the time of Moses when is was specifically ...


19

To address the claim that Cain moved away and then found his wife, this simply isn't stated in the text. Perhaps the confusion is on the phrasing. Genesis 4:16-17 doesn't say that Cain met his wife in the land of Nod. Here is the King James Version of those verses: And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the ...


13

Adam and Eve had more children; this is found in Genesis 5:4 And the days of Adam after he had begotten Seth were eight hundred years: and he begat sons and daughters: I found my answer on this Christian site. On that particular site it is argued that the woman Cain married had to be one of his sisters. They argue against the theory that God created ...


13

The number 7, symbol of perfection In Egypt In Ancient Egypt, the numer seven was considered a symbol of perfection and efficiency. In many myths, the number 7 is used for both good and bad events. Then Ra repented. His fierce anger passed away, and he sought to save the remnant of mankind. He sent messengers, who ran swifter than the storm wind, unto ...


12

The story of Theophilus of Adana, who died in the 6th century CE, is indeed the first documented story of a pact of this type: The subject of the first recorded story of a pact with the devil, Theophilus of Adana humbly declined to become bishop of Adana, now in modern Turkey. Historical Dictionary of Witchcraft Eythichianus of Adana seems to have ...


11

This answer will be based on the Catholic traditions in regards to Satan and the nine choirs of angels. Although it is now generally accept that there are nine choirs of angel and each choir is of angel is different and ranked accordingly. During the Middle Ages, many schemes were proposed, some drawing on and expanding on Pseudo-Dionysius, others ...


9

Why is the Devil also known as Lucifer (and other names) three-faced? To understand this symbolic meaning of Dante in his Canto XXXIV, we have to have a basic understanding of the beliefs of the Catholic Church. First of all, the devil was a murderer and the father of lies from the beginning. Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your ...


9

It depends on which language we're talking about. 1st-century A.D. Palestine was a multicultural, multilingual location (not much unlike the same region is at present day). The classic Biblical indication of this, in the canonical biographies of Jesus, is John 19.19-20, which says that when Jesus was crucified, Pilate also wrote an inscription and put it ...


9

The relevance and applicability of the Mosaic Code to Christians, especially gentile Christians, is a vexed theological question that Paul addresses and tries to finesse in more than one of his epistles—but those are rather theological discourses than mythic narratives, and so less proper for this community’s attention. The New Testament ...


9

If an angel can fall, can a demon rise? According to most Christian teaching and traditions, the short answer is no. Your question however does pose certain interesting perplexities to say the least. First of all, I would like to make it clear that the Gospels do mention that there is such a thing as an unpardonable sin that man can commit. The ...


8

The magnitude of Cain's crime was immense. According to the record in Genesis, the first children of Adam and Eve that we know of are Cain, Abel, and Seth. At the time that Cain killed Abel, then, it is plausible to conclude that Cain just killed half of the rest of the human race. It's bad enough to kill someone else, worse to kill them over the quality of ...


8

Since Medieval times the following punishments have been assigned to the 7 deadly sins. Pride - You will be broken on the wheel Envy - Placed in freezing water Gluttony - Force fed rats, toads and snakes Lust - Covered in fire and brimstone Anger - Live dismemberment Greed - Boiled in oil Sloth - Thrown into a snake pit The list of the 7 sins came first ...


8

Lilith in Mesopotamia First Lilith (Lilitu) is of Mesopotamian origin. She is a female "demon"/"succubus" (Consider I use here modern terms, Sumerian or Akkadian got no clue what those was). We find her in diverse stories most notable one is when she is coming to haunt Inanna's tree in Inanna and the Hullupu tree (We don't know what an Huluppu tree is). ...


8

Jesus is the Medieval Latin spelling of Iesus (the 'i' is consonantal), itself derived from the Greek Ἰησοῦς, as bleh noted, which transcribed in Latin characters would be Iesous, close to your Iseous (which does not otherwise exist as a name). The name is ultimately Semitic, and came into Greek as the Aramaic שׁוּעַ (Yeshua), from the Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (...


8

Short answer: probably yes. He's our primary source for a lot of myths, which makes it hard to say our interpretations are accurate to what was believed a thousand plus years ago because we don't have anything to compare it to. He was Christian, and likely fudged/altered much of his recording of the myths to make them fit into the Christian worldview.(such ...


7

It's worth looking further down Canto XXXIV (I'm using a slightly different translation) to see just who is stuffed into Lucifer's mouths: "That upper spirit, Who hath worst punishment," so spake my guide, "Is Judas, he that hath his head within And plies the feet without. Of th' other two, Whose heads are under, from the murky jaw Who hangs, is ...


7

It appears the Theophilus of Adana is, indeed, the first known instance of this myth. Dating the origin of the myth was a bit harder for me to establish. It is claimed to have been written by Eutychianus of Adana, but the claim seems questionable to me, and, I've come to find out, others as well. "A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and ...


7

Dante conceived of the architecture of Hell as an inverted church. The higher circles are lesser sins, and each descending circle represents what he saw as greater sins. The sin of Lust was, to Dante, getting so swept up in your passion or your emotion that you lost sight of God. That was both Dido's and Cleopatra's besetting sin. From John Ciardi's ...


7

The word "hell" came into existence sometime before 900 AD/CE. It is from the "Middle [and] Old English hel(l); cognate with Old High German hell(i)a (German Hölle), Old Norse hel, [and] Gothic halja". 1 Being that the first English translation of the Bible was written (by John Wycliffe) in 1380's,2 the word hell was already in use by then. Just as the ...


7

It depends what you mean by "demi-god". They are of somewhat divine origin, by most understandings of "sons of God" (ancient Hebrew sources identify them with angels of some description). They were men of great renown. That much is in common with the Greek tradition of heroes of divine heritage. However, the Greek heroes (not all of whom were demi-gods in ...


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