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One of the purposes, in regard to Greek mythology, is elevating human dignity, which leads to humanism. In the Trojan war, the gods are portrayed as petty and squabbling, where Hector, in particular, is portrayed as selfless and honorable. The poem begins by invoking the goddess "Sing, Goddess of the..." but is focused on the rage of Achilles, not the ...


4

You can trace this back to either the Mesopotamian Gilgamesh epic, or ancient Egyptian constellations, mutated during the Greek rule of Egypt of the Ptolemaic dynasties. Much has been written on the first, but only recently the latter has been studied in greater detail, and it actually has links with the Gilgamesh epic, so I will elaborate on the latter ...


4

The story of Cybele(Κυβηλη) and Attis(Αττις) "‘What causes the impulse [of the devotees of Cybele] to self-castrate?’ I was silent. The Pierid Mousa (Muse) began : ‘A woodland Phrygian boy, the gorgeous Attis, conquered the towered goddess with pure love. She wanted to keep him as her shrine's guardian, and said, "Desire to be a boy always." He ...


3

Depending on your criteria, you may find the story of Osiris interesting. In Plutarch's (wikilink) version of the story, after Set (Osiris's brother) had cut Osiris into many pieces and scattered them across the world, Osiris's wife, Isis, found all the pieces except his penis, which had been eaten by a fish. Plutarch also states that Set steals and ...


3

My answer covers personifications and deities of wisdom and ignorance from Hindu or Hinduism mythology point of view. In Hinduism mythology, there are various gods/goddesses which are associated with wisdom, learning and knowledge etc. , most prominently Hindu god Ganesha, goddess Saraswati, goddesses Gayatri etc. and lot's of stories about these deities of ...


3

There are two that you can download from Project Gutenberg for free. Armenian Legends And Poems by Z. C. Boyajian (2017) Armenian Legends And Festivals by L. A. Boettiger (2011)


3

Sadly, I've never been able to find any direct references to Mathonwy anywhere. Bromwich (pg. 439) mentions that the name Mathonwy itself could be a doublet for the name Math, like so many names in Culhwch ac Olwen are. If so, Mathonwy may never have represented a specific character. One final thing worth mentioning is that it's unclear whether Mathonwy ...


2

There is the Lore of the Yaksha & Yakshini. As well as Kinnara & Kinnari. Also Refer to a Tangential Piece of mine if you so feel. The Mythos of 'Yakshi'


2

You cannot deny the Hebrew-Sumerian connection, for example: in creation, both stories identify creation of modern man as the Adamu (derived from Adam); then, there was Abraham who was raised up from Ur of the Chaldeans.


2

Are the Nephilim the demi-gods of the bible? Impossible to say, but I doubt it. Let us start by seeing who the Nephilim of the Scripture may truly be: The Nephilim (Hebrew: נְפִילִים) were the offspring of the "sons of God" and the "daughters of men" before the Deluge, according to Genesis 6:1-4. A similar or identical biblical Hebrew term, read ...


2

The short answer is it's hard to know. I'd personally think that the end of Ragnarok, where one man and one woman survive and repopulate the earth, and Heimdall (called The White God in Gylfaginning), becomes the supreme god, mostly because that seems awfully familiar and Christian. Loki's role? Seems rather demonic given he usually acts as a balancer, chaos-...


2

Succession myths are probably as old as religion itself. The oldest surviving written religious myths we know are of Mesopotamia and Egypt. In Mesopotamian mythology, the god [Anu] is overthrown by his son Kumarbi. In Ancient Egyptian mythology, Seth is overthrown by his nephew Horus As for the cyclic mythologies that @fifthviolet mentions, I can only ...


2

I've found this very interesting article in Wikipedia about Kumarbi. Kumarbi is the chief god of the Hurrians. He is the son of Anu (the sky), and father of the storm-god Teshub. He was identified by the Hurrians with Sumerian Enlil, by the Greeks as Kronos and by the Ugaritians with El. Now things get interesting in terms of missing body parts: ...


2

The "lore" in folklore originally refers to orally conveyed cultural knowledge and traditions. Either this orally conveyed information pre-dates that culture developing writing, or the "folk" (i.e. the common people) were not educated in the writing system. Therefore, the generation and spreading of folklore that originiated in an oral tradition or the ...


2

Heracles is said to have had intercourse with the 50 daughters of Thespius or Thestius in one night, all of whom bore him sons (Diodorus Siculus, Library 4.29.3) In another version, one daughter refused, making the number 49 (Pausanius, Description of Greece 9.27.6). However, in some less impressive versions, this took place over a week (Herodorus apud ...


1

Possible: There are some very old oral traditions circulating even the largely demythologised West. We also know that, for example, Australian oral tradition recounts a number of extremely ancient and nevertheless historical events. An example is the formation of certain volcanoes that occurred more than 35,000 years ago. Other examples, from Australia and ...


1

Unlikely. The last hominid species that went extinct is the Neanderthal around 30.000 BCE. It's very improbable oral tradition would have kept this relation intact in the stories for 30 millennia. Anthropological studies of oral traditions have illustrated the original content of such stories is very quickly distorted beyond recognition.


1

It was fashionable. Being connected with Troy was considered prestigious. Hence Virgil claimed that Aeneas had escaped the fall of Troy to go to Rome and become an ancestor of Romulus. An unknown author claimed that a descendant of Aeneas, Brutus, had become the first king of Britain and given it its name. Snorri was working within that tradition.


1

Actually, while the evidence is fragmentary and confusing, it points more to their having been separate, and then merging together. There are several elements contributing here to the identification. There were the interpretatio graeca and also the interpretatio romana in which Greeks and Romans respectively interpreted another culture's gods as their own ...


1

Hinduism is the third largest religion in the world and is thought to be the oldest religion in the world to date. Hinduism is the world's third largest religion. It is an Indian religion and dharma, or way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia. Hinduism has been called the oldest religion in the world, and some ...


1

There is a theory that over the course of the evolution of Norse mythology this has actually happened - Tyr, god of justice, is theorized to have been the previous head of the pantheon, and had Christianity not interrupted, the same thing may have happened again. There is a mention on Ragnarok that Heimdall becomes head of a 'new' pantheon, or at least the ...


1

This "falling from grace" story did not originate with Christianity. Take Tantalos for example, or Zeus banishing Hades to the underworld. As for earlier "fruit-picking" mythology, there's the story of the Monkey King stealing the peaches of eternal life from the Jade Palace in Chinese mythology.


1

Strange question. That is far more language than a modern man or anyone ever talked! I can't give texts to all of that, but: Coptic: You have the fairly excellent Coptic scriptorium, you probably don't need any other resource that this one, both huge and complete. You will need a little bit of copy paste, considering you have the text in coptic, a ...


1

...the northern constellations circle the North star, therefore it is the hub, which is to say the seat of the axle/axis. So, for those cultures that envisage this hypothetical pillar as a tree, the bear and the dragon circle this tree most closely...


1

Frank Zappa put it like this: The only difference between a cult and a religion is the amount of real estate they own Compare the advent of the internet to the invention of the printing press: the principle thing that changes is the velocity of myth propagation. The printing press was one of the most important religious "weapons" during the reformation. ...


1

Not really. Although Shinto rituals involve giving thanks with the implication that giving thanks will bring good things in the future, fate as we generally define it is a novel idea in Japanese culture. There is a Shinto superstition that says if you ask "what if" questions they will come true, but it doesn't attribute this to fate deities. Having said ...


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