16

This idea based on the Sumerian myth known as Enki and Ninhursag (see ANET, pp. 37-41) keeps popping up, especially in popular literature and on the internet. Kramer, however, did give credence to it, as mentioned by the blogger to whom you linked (see Kramer's History Begins at Sumer, pp. 143-44). To make a long story short, the god Enki out of curiosity ...


13

First, there was nothing. Absolutely nothing. Then, In the beginning there was only Chaos. Then out of the void appeared Erebus, the unknowable place where death dwells, and Night. All else was empty, silent, endless, dark. Then, Love was born bringing along the beginning of order. From Love emerged Light, followed by Gaea, the earth. http://www....


13

There isn't much to go on with this one. The best first source I can find is a book called Myths and Legends of the New York State Iroquois, by Harriet Maxwell Converse, 1908. It's about as good of a first source as there's going to be, since Iroquois stories were transmitted from generation to generation orally, and other people like Ms. Converse had to be ...


13

The Aboriginal people are protective of their culture, and they do not share all of their stories with the rest of the world. For them, much of what transpired is a private matter, and so only some stories can be accessed. (Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories - Jukurrpa, Gadi Mirrabooka Aboriginal Stories, The Australian Aboriginal "Dreamtime" (Its History, ...


11

The entire story can be found here. This story deals with a Creator god (Earthmaker) who was alone in space, with nothing around him. His first "creation" was his tears, which forms oceans, lakes, and streams. His following creations (light, earth, plants, etc.) were all thought into existence. He then made man out of clay, and breathed life into man. ...


9

Well, before Gaea and Uranus there were a few gods, but not many. In the Greek story of creation it says In the beginning there was only Chaos. Then out of the void appeared Erebus, the unknowable place where death dwells, and Night. All else was empty, silent, endless, dark. Then, Love was born bringing along the beginning of order. From Love emerged ...


8

It is true that he created other giants spontaneously, from the sweat of his armpit, and from between his feet (same idea). However, the Prose Edda (ch. 8) tells us that the cow Audhumla fed him with her milk, and while he could have been passively fed like a patient on a drip, it seems unlikely. So presumably he was awake at least some of the time.


8

The site that michaelpri gives is incorrect. Here is the relevant passage in Hesiod, starting at line 116: First Chaos came to be, but next wide-bosomed Earth (Gaia), the ever-sure foundations of all the deathless ones who hold the peaks of snowy Olympus, and dim Tartarus in the depth of the wide-pathed Earth, and Love (Eros), fairest among the deathless ...


8

I'm not an Operating Thetan either, nor do I want to be. Fortunately, those of us who aren't permitted to be in the know do have access to some documents, including the Fishman Affidavit. I worked off of the transcript/analysis here. Quoting an analysis of OT III material, from the Affidavit, Let's turn to Incident II, which allegedly happened 75 million ...


7

This might be a lot more common than you'd think. Many examples come from creation myths, perhaps because having a creator at all begs the obvious question, "who created the creator?" One solution is to declare the creator eternal. The other is a self-created deity. For instance, the creator god in ǃKung mythology called ≠Gao!na: ≠Gao!na created himself; ...


7

First, I took a look at Wikipedia. It explains that the Rainbow Serpent may have been inspired by one or more of the following Australian snakes: The rough-scaled python The taipan The file snake These snakes could inspire cultures across the continent. Research tells me that the rough-scaled python is active in a small area of Western Australia, though ...


6

It's not made clear how the Earth was created. It just came to be, having been born after Chaos came into existence: Citing Wikipedia: Η Γαία (αρχ. ελλ.: Γαῖα) προϋπήρχε με το Χάος και τον Έρωτα-Φάνη στη δημιουργία του Κόσμου. Earth pre-existed with Chaos and Eros (Love) in the creation of the world. Citing Theogonia: First of all Chawos [Gap] ...


5

It is not known because the relevant part of the Sumerian version of the myth is missing, but in later versions the cause is the god Enlil. From an article in Livius.org: The Great Flood: Sumerian version. The story survives on a cuneiform tablet from the seventeenth century BCE, of which only the lower third survives. However, this is sufficient to ...


4

The numbers likely have no special significance. The quoted passages all share one feature: they use parallelism, specifically one in which a number is named in one line, and then in the next line the next higher number is used instead. This is an interesting feature of the text which occurs many times. One can also find similar features in old Semitic ...


4

I'll do a similar assessment of the Norse segment, since I'm most familiar with it, and because I think it is a good illustration of why giant beings are at least sometimes featured in such myths. Technically speaking, Ymir did not create the world, he was the world (well, specifically, "the world," minus Muspellheim, Niflheim, and Ginnungagap, which ...


4

Looks like Kumulipo, an 18th-century chant in the Hawaiian language telling a creation story. According to Wikipedia, the summary of the story is, In the Kumulipo the world was created over a cosmic night. This is not just one night, but many nights over time. The ancient Hawaiian kahunas and priests of the Hawaiian religion would recite the Kumulipo ...


4

I recently read Neil Gaiman's Norse Mythology. Although he's probably not considered the top authority on Norse Mythology, he did study the important works of Sturluson. Here's a quote right form the beginning, to add to what you already said about Muspelheim and Niflheim (and this quote is on the back cover): Before the beginning there was nothing - no ...


3

Athena never did. There was also an account, stating that Prometheus had created men out of earth and water, at the very beginning of the human race, or after the flood of Deucalion, when Zeus is said to have ordered him and Athena to make men out of the mud, and the winds to breathe life into them (Apollod. i. 7. § 1; Ov. Met. i. 81; Etym. Mag. s. v. ...


2

The snake as a symbol for creation is common across many cultures mythologies. The mythologist Joseph Campbell pointed out that The serpent sheds its skin to be born again ... it lives by killing and eating itself, casting off death and being reborn, like the moon


1

Well you could read the Kumulipo, Papa and Wākea werenʻt the first beings, but Pō and I think Laʻilaʻi. If you want a simpler shorter version starting with Papa (Earth mother) and Wākea (Sky Father) this is what I learned from my kumu: I think Rangi is not part of the Hawaiian version. Hāloa is the first man who all Hawaiians descended from and this is why ...


1

I find myself agreeing with Arthur George: The connection is indeed tenuous, as to Enki and Ninti being recast as Adam and Eve in the Bible, based on Professor Kramer's suggestion. I have written two books on the subject in 2010, available at Amazon.com on the internet, (1) Eden's Serpent: Its Mesopotamian Origin, and (2) The Garden of Eden Myth: Its Pre-...


1

Hesiod's Theogony In Greek mythology there are a few different theogonies (accounts of the origin of the gods), the most "mainstream" of which is entitled simply the Theogony, written by the poet Hesiod. In this poem of Hesiod's, Gaia (the Earth), without the assistance of male seed, gave birth to Uranus (the Sky), in order for him to be a sort of dome to ...


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