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In Greek Mythology, the Minotaur was a singular creature, the man/bull hybrid offspring of King Minos' wife. Minotaur is a proper noun meaning "bull of Minos", while the creature itself was known as Asterion in its native Crete. The use of Minotaur as a species name, and the idea that more of these creatures exist, is a purely 20th Century concept, ...


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The Minotaur was a lone creature, the first and only of it's kind. The unfortunate result of a Greek God loosing his temper. Shortly after King Minos (or Minos The King) ascended to the throne of the island of Crete, he began to pray to Poseidon for a sign of his right to sit on said throne. Poseidon sent a snow-white bull, the Cretan Bull, out of the sea as ...


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It was built specifically as a prison for the minotaur. See this article The most famous labyrinth is found in Greek mythology: Designed by Daedalus for King Minos of Knossos to contain the ferocious Minotaur (a half-man and half-bull monster). I'd elaborate further but there's not much more to say that could add value to the answer.


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It was built specifically to keep the Minotaur in. If you are familiar with the story of the Minotaur, it was the son of Pasiphae, who was the king of Crete's (King Minos) wife. Minos wanted a sign from the gods that he was meant to rule, so Poseidon sent a great bull out of the sea, and told Minos to sacrifice it to him. Minos liked the bull so much that ...


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Okay, first of all, Apollo is actually pretty neutral in the beginning of the war, very much like Zeus. It's after Zeus orders him to go get involved that he enters the war. Zeus secretly favored the Trojans, and hence he sent Apollo to help them. Apollo did that. But we can't deny that Apollo did that just because Zeus asked him to. First of all, Apollo ...


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Iapyx the son of Daedalus is a different character from the physician compatriot of Aeneas. For some reason certain translators, especially in previous centuries, render the name of Aeneas's companion into English as Iapis (e.g. John Dryden's 1697 translation of Virgil's Æneid; William Smith's 1867 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology; & ...


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