Hot answers tagged

2

This got too long for a comment, so I hope it's all right to post here. The Writing in Margins blog is mine, so I'd like to offer a few addendums. It's always hard to disprove something rather than prove it, but I really haven't found any books of Welsh folklore that mention corgis as fairy steeds. There's Giraldus Cambrensis' Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin ...


2

This is most likely a recent invention by Corgi breeders & enthusiasts. From "Did fairies really ride corgis?": The earliest source I can find is the poem "Corgi Fantasy" by Anne G. Biddlecombe of Dorset, England. She was one of the top Pembroke breeders of the 1940s and 1950s, and a founding member of the Welsh Corgi League in ...


2

Fairies were not traditionally winged in folklore, and it seems unlikely that Michael Drayton imagined Nymphidia with wings; the first mention of winged fairies is usually dated to 1712. Fairies were widely believed to have the capability of flight or high-speed travel. See, for instance, Robert Kirk’s Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies (1691) ...


1

From "How Did Fairies Get Their Wings?": Search Google images for “fairies” and you find pages of diminutive human-like magical creatures with insect wings, often with pointed or animal ears and occasionally with antennae. Too often, this stereotypical fairy is at odds with the literature that produced her. No mention of such features appears in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible