Hot answers tagged

8

Aeschylus, Eumenides 971 ff : "[The Eumenides bless the Athenians with good fortune :] ‘I forbid deadly and untimely fate for men; grant to lovely maidens life with a husband, you that have the rightful power; you, divine Moirai (Moirae, Fates), our sisters by one mother, divinities who distribute justly, who have a share in every home, and whose ...


6

It is interesting that in Chinese lore, a red thread was said to connect lovers. Note that the actual name is the "Red String of Fate". The Chinese tradition does not have a direct analogue to the Moirai so far as I know, and there tends to be more emphasis on "fortune" as in bad/good, presided over by the god Caishen. However it is ...


6

Yes, surprisingly, The Moirai were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction; and Zeus, as well as the other gods and man, had to submit to them. From here Quintus Smyrnaeus, "To the Moirai (Moirae, Fates) the might of Zeus must bow;...


6

Wikipedia gives us the four "3-fate pantheons." Oldest As you list, the Moirai. Their name means "Parts." "Shares" or "Alottted Portions." The individuals were Klotho (Clotho), the "the Spinner," who spun the thread of life, Lakhesis (Lachesis), "the Apportioner of Lots", who measured it, and Atropos (or Aisa), "She who cannot be turned," who cut it ...


5

So, there are a couple things here. Parcae refers to the Roman Fates, while Moirai (or Moerae) refer to the Greek Fates. Next, "parts" is a not particularly helpful translation. The better one is the third one you shared, "allotted portions" (or apportioned lots). It instead refers to their activity. There were three Fates in Greek mythology, which you can ...


4

The translation given by DukeZhou is going for good, idiomatic English—but that means literal accuracy has to be sacrificed sometimes. Here's what Ovid wrote: esse quoque in fatis reminiscitur, adfore tempus, quo mare, quo tellus correptaque regia caeli ardeat et mundi moles obsessa laboret. A very literal translation: Also, he remembered that ...


4

If you mean some sort of book, there doesn't appear to be anything of the kind. However... In the poem Voluspa, the Norns do write, or at least carve on wood (verse 20). From there came three maidens, knowing much three from the lake that stands under the tree Destiny they called one, Becoming the second - they carved on wood tablets - Shall-be ...


1

Of course, the deeper side of this is the worldview it reflects: a cosmic determinism and a mechanistic precision. Even Zeus/Jupiter had to bow before the Fates. An individual's lot was predetermined at birth; the process was in most cases impersonal; and when one's exact time was up, there was little negotiable latitude. There may also be significance ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible