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9

Salt has had a strong significance in a lot of different religions for millennia. I believe that salt used for the explicit purpose of repelling demons originates from Buddhism or Shintoism, where salt is used to purify/sanctify a places and ward off evil spirits. I think Supernatural draws from the Wiccan culture for its usage of salt though, as Wiccan ...


7

Pliny the Younger tells the story of a haunted house in Athens, featuring the stoic Athenodorus Cananites, in his letter to Sura: Now the following story, which I am going to tell you just as I heard it, is it not more terrible than the former, while quite as wonderful? There was at Athens a large and roomy house, which had a bad name, so that no one ...


7

Salt is a preservative. The Tarim Mummies were preserved in salt for 4000 years. If you pack meat in salt it will not rot. (Because it sucks all the water out and kills any bacteria. Water is necessary for life.) Since people could not see microscopic organisms before the invention of microscopes rot, decay, and putrefaction were associated with evil ...


7

Why is salt associated with repelling of demons? This seems like an almost impossible question to answer. The origins are very obscure. Firstly, what does salt symbolize? Judeo-Christian traditions considered salt a purifier, and the symbol of the eternal nature of God’s covenant with Israel. There are more than 30 references to salt in the Old and New ...


7

Salt is a natural cleanser, and can be used to scour out pots, as toothpaste, to remove rust, etc. (See this page for more.) So it's not a big leap from there to supernatural cleansing. As for salting and burning the bones, a parallel custom was burning a conquered city and salting the ground, so nothing would grow there. The Romans supposedly did this with ...


7

This is an answer given by my Indian grandpa, so please take it with a pinch of salt. As most hero-villain war stories in old movies and old stories in India go, it mostly involves the protagonist hitting the antagonist on the head, behind by a club or some kind of a weapon, knocking him/it cold. So, the bhoots(or more popularly called "chudails") have ...


5

It relates to Spiritualism and modern extensions. Essentially, spiritualism uses "magic tricks" (illusions) to create the impression of paranormal activity, often as simple as thumping a table or flickering candles. These techniques have been extended to electrical interference per a recent trend called EVP (electronic voice phenomenon). As Rodia ...


5

Obviously, this is a modern trope, not true folklore, as electrification process took from around the 1880s to the 1960s. I suspect this idea of ghosts affecting electricity originated in the movie Poltergeist (1982), but in the TV Tropes site, under their entry: Electromagnetic Ghosts, the older example I could find was Richard Matheson's Hell House, a ...


4

The earliest is likely Gilgamesh and Enkidu as told in the Sumerian standalone poem Gilgamesh, Enkidu, and the Nether World: Warrior Gilgamec, son of Ninsumun, directed his steps on his own to E-kur, the temple of Enlil. He cried before Enlil: "Father Enlil, my ellag fell down into the nether world, my ekidma fell down into Ganzer. Enkidu went down to ...


2

In certain Christian traditions, holy water is a mixture of salt and water that has been blessed by a priest. Witches, vampires, and other nasty evil creatures were considered violently allergic to holy water. In the middle ages, due to the demand, there was even a delivery service for holy water in cities, like the milkman in the 20th century.


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