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Xenophon's Anabasis Reading Xenophon's Anabasis the sneeze of a soldier in his army while giving a speech was interpreted as a clear sign of the god(s), in this case the god in question was Zeus Soter as noted below. “The perjury and faithlessness of the barbarians has been spoken of by Cleanor and is understood, I imagine, by the rest of you. If, then, it ...


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In Homer's Illiad, in the conflict between Athena and Ares, Athena puts on the cap and becomes completely invisible to Ares. Then Pallas Athene grasped the lash and the reins, and against Ares first she speedily drave the single-hooved horses. He was stripping of his armour huge Periphas that was far the best of the Aetolians, the glorious son of Ochesius. ...


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One can perhaps approach it from a perspective of the history of science and think about how the people at the time would have understood the physics of seeing and light. You ask the very good question: "if the shield did become invisible because he was carrying it, how could he use it? Could he himself see it (and the reflection in it) even though it ...


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Κητος Τροιας, The monster of Troy In a glass case in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, a strange creature lurks on an ancient Greek vase. This vase painting, made in the famous pottery center of Corinth in the sixth century B.C.E, is known to art historians as the oldest illustration of the story of the Monster of Troy, a creature described in Homeric legends....


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Unfortunately, Aristophanes doesn't give any particular name for these pairs: he just calls them "people" or "humans" (ἀνθρώποι). He calls the half-man-half-woman one "androgynous" (ἀνδρόγυνος), but that's a common enough word nowadays that it wouldn't be a clear reference. But later, he gives the origin of each gender: ἦν δὲ ...


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The form Gdan-Ma (conventionally taken to mean "Earth Mother") is attested in Phrygian, so it's been suggested that Classical Greek Gā/Gē and Mycenaean Da are different ways of simplifying a Pre-Greek (so probably non-Indo-European) name that didn't fit perfectly into Greek phonology. In other words, according to this theory, "Da" is an ...


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As far as I'm aware, almost certainly not. There is no such index dedicated especially and specifically to whether any two (or more) characters from the mythology interact with each other (or with one another) or not. I would say that the best one could do in approaching something approximate to this would be an encyclopaedia, in the use of which sometimes ...


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Perhaps you're thinking of the opposite of "a father had a prophecy that his son would die", in which case it is the story of Oedipus. An oracle tells the king that his new son Oedipus will one day kill him. To prevent this, he sends his son to be adopted by a king in a different country. Years later, an oracle tells grown-up Oedipus that he will ...


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Zeus' thunderbolt in ancient times was often depicted as a single weapon. It was usually depicted as a winged flaming staff with lightning wrapped around it (although the lighting then was different from the zig zag we use today, it's got more right angles). You can see this in the heraldry of the Roman legions and into the Middle Ages in heraldry. Here's a ...


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