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Definitions Presumably by "demigods" you are referring to the relatively modern term as taken to denote a character from Greco-Roman mythology who is the offspring of a deity and of a human being. The Ancient Greek hēmítheos and the Latin semideus, from which we get the English "demigod," does literally mean "half-god," but this ...


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In myths, demigods normally live for the average human lifespan, but there is no riskier job than the one demigods have. The only demigod that actually had a happy ending was Perceus, but most of the other ones died younger.


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The Greeks may have had offerings, like most religions, but it is said that the Greek gods did not like blood offerings, but it may be similar to the Cretans. Also, I do not believe that that is Nectar, simply because Nectar was the Greeks name for honey.


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One might say that he is both, depending on a few different factors in question. Classification Issues In Greco-Roman mythology the "gods" are not a special category in the same sense that the modern Western taxonomical terms "species" and "race" would entail. Being a θεός (theós), "god," is more a matter of status or ...


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Though Typhon is addressed as being a Titan In the movies, Typhon was not a Titan in real mythology; merely a ferocious monster whom Gaia had given birth to long after giving birth to the twelve Titans. In other versions, he was said to be the god of windstorms and drought, but still a son of Gaia and Tartarus. In conclusion, Typhon is more Titan than god, ...


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Both have three heads? Any correlation?


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The first strong parallel to come to mind is the Naga: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C4%81ga They are principally depicted in three forms: wholly human with snakes on the heads and necks, common serpents, or as half-human half-snake beings.[3] A female naga is a "Nagi", "Nagin", or "Nagini". Nagaraja is seen as the king of ...


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David Braund in Myth and Ritual at Sinope: From Diogenes the Cynic to Sanape the Amazon and Askold Ivantchik in Les légendes de fondation de Sinope du Pont (in french) give thorough overviews on the foundation myths of Sinope (which are surprisingly rich). There are indeed some references to the Amazons, for example: Then Sinope a polis named after one of ...


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In the absence of any statements to the contrary, I think it is safe to assume that demigods have normal human lifespans for people of their rank and profession (i.e. Bronze Age soldiers and royalty). I can't recall any myths that mention, for example, a demigod dramatically outliving their non-demigod spouses, the way that Arwen is foretold to outlive ...


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Hades is generally believed to have been faithful to Persephone. The story of Minthe (which you mentioned as evidence of infidelity) isn't about Hades's infidelity, it's about his crazy ex-girlfriend. It's a myth specifically about Hades REFUSING to betray Persephone, even in the face of an ex-lover who wants him back. "Mint (Mintha), men say, was once ...


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Spirit, soul, cannot be destroyed. Therefore a tree spirit will not die but merely transmute when a tree is felled, in the same way that the human soul does not die when the body dies.


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Take a look at how they were birthed. They were the 100 children of Sky and Earth. These parents alone can give you insight as to what they can produce. Snakes also represent a close affinity with the Earth. However, those were merely the newest Roman versions. In the earlier Greek classical sources, they were depicted as looking like men, wearing armour, ...


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I would like to clear up the stereotype that surrounds Hades and makes him look like a bad guy. In modern time whenever you watch a movie or play a videogame where Hades is one of the characters they make it seem as though he is evil and I think that's based around the fact that he rules the underworld. Let's go back in time to how it was he came to be the ...


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Zeus is more powerful than Hera and all the other gods. In fact, he is even stronger than all of them put together, if we take his word for it (Iliad 8.19-27). This is what Zeus says to Hera after he realizes that she had tricked him into falling asleep in order to help the Achaeans: The sire of gods and men had pity on him, and looked fiercely on Juno. &...


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I can think of three times Zeus' rule was challenged: The Gigantomachy was a war pitting the Olympians and Gigantes. Gaia, distraught at how her Titan sons were imprisoned, sent her sons the Gigantes to overthrow Zeus. Prophecy stated they needed a demigod, and they had just that (Dionysus and Heracles). The Gigantes were defeated and rule was secured, but ...


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