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A Few Heads Taller Than the Tallest? Assuming that the rest of the Greek deities were about the same size as Aphrodite, then the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite strongly suggests that they were something like abnormally large or tall humans, or, at the very least, as tall as the house of a shepherd-prince in Dardania a generation before the Trojan War. The hymn ...


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Hera Of the three sisters Hera is the only one regarding whom I have found mention of her direct involvement in a narrated fight scene. Dionysos' War in India In Book 36 of Nonnus' Dionysiaca,1 the Olympian deities square off against one another in a battle during the war waged by the young wine-god Dionysos [Dionysus] against his kinsman King Deriades of ...


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The lost poem Hermes by Eratosthenes seems to be the source for the myth of Hera suckling Hermes. In his paper Theodulus' Ecloga and Mythographus Vaticanus 1, Winfried Bühler, referring to this particular version of the myth, says: This is indeed a rare version. In ancient literature, it occurs only as an aition of the origin of the Milky Way: Mercurius - ...


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The Achille's Heel folk motif, i.e. invulnerability except in one spot, is a very common one worldwide. It appears as motif number Z311 in Thompson's Motif-Index of Folk-Literature, where an incomplete list of attestations of the motif is given, ranging from Irish to African folklore, passing through Jewish, Eskimo and Siberian tales. With such widespread ...


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Artemis represents the untamed and wild, on the fringe of civilization. Animals are mortal and must die eventually as part of the cycle because humans must eat animals and sometimes animals must eat humans. She hunts because humans must eat but she kills within proscribed limits and boundaries. Her actions support the cosmological order. Orion like Artemis ...


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ACTION SCENES We have several details connected with the part of the chronology in question, but as far as I've been able to find, beyond plain statements about there having been a cosmic conflict, there are only two fairly fleshed-out fight scenes from this war. One of them is the final showdown between the Olympians and the Titans, narrated at some length ...


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My sense is that the ancient Greeks did not believe the gods to be a specific size. It strikes me that they took the large scale statues, such as the famous Zeus at Olympia, as literal representations, and I'll have to review the passages of the Iliad where mortals wound gods, but my recollection is of the gods as towering on the battlefield. I don't think ...


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The Greeks worshipped many deadly gods, such as Poseidon and Ares, so that they wouldn't be angered.


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I'd propose: Hector He could have fled Troy, but stayed to defend his home and family, even ultimately facing Achilles in a battle he knew he could not win. When Achilles drags Hector's body around Troy, the corpse is incorruptible, which can be taken as a precedent for Jesus' incorruptible body. the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite, kept dogs from him by day ...


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The gods were able to sometimes pass as human, so I would argue human sized. https://classroom.synonym.com/interaction-humans-gods-greek-mythology-13678.html has a couple examples. Specifically: Demeter disguising herself as an old woman Zeus and Hermes disguising themselves as humans


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