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This is a follow-up to the accepted answer, which I think provides a good account for Pittheus' motivation, as backed up by the entry for Pittheus in The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4th edn): [Pittheus] got [Aegeus] drunk and put him to bed with his daughter Aethra, thus becoming the grandfather of Theseus and creating a family tie between his own small ...


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A grandson. Since his purpose was to get him to sleep with his daughter, he must have deduced that the resulting son would be something special, and special enough to risk angering Aegeus. At least, on the face of it. There are no myths that go into what he was thinking.


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Hecate was the goddess of the harvest and often put on banquets for the gods and sometimes mortals. You also have Pan who was worshipped as the "party god" and/or Dionysus God of the vine.


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Hebe Hebe was the cup-bearer and poured ambrosia and nectar of the gods. You might know her better as the wife of Hercules, who upon his ascension to Mount Olympus "got" her from his enemy and her mother Hera as reconciliation. "Now the gods at the side of Zeus were sitting in council over the golden floor, and among them the goddess Hebe (Youth) poured ...


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In the book Odyssey, it's said that ambrosia was carried to Olympus by doves [1]: Here not even a bird may pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to Father Jove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and Father Jove has to send another to make up their number Also, Demeter was considered the goddess of crops and ...


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Evidently no, there is no such concern is the ancient accounts of this story. Like many other extraordinary elements of these tales, such as Orpheus charming his way into the land of the dead by the power of his music, the assumption is simply that such things must have been possible. Book 5 of Statius' Silvae describes Eurydice as having a funeral pyre, ...


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Of what I have been able to find, none of the surviving ancient source material for these myths tells us when the suit for Helen at Sparta occurred in relation to the Epigoni's battle on Lake Glisas, nor when Diomedes got married to Aegialeia [Aegialia] in relation to either of these aforementioned events. And Wikipedia (per the article you are citing) ...


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Ares, Greek god of war, being the epitome of the horrors of war, was accompanied by his children Deimos (dread), Phobos (fear) and Eris, not his daughter but the goddess of discord with several parentages disputed. He wore a cape of the skin of men he had killed. He was fickle promising to fight on one side one day and changing his mind the next. He was ...


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From the west. Note that Boreaus, the North Wind, brought cold winter air from the north.


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You can't categorize the Olympians with DC/Marvel labels. The Ancient Greeks didn't even think of their gods as we currently think of that concept. Greek gods were regarded much more like the deep, layered human characters of Bronte or Wolf. That's why virtually all Olympian myths are tragedies.


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Why would someone worship such a god? So he didn't smite you for your insolence. Who are you, a mere mortal, to presume to withhold due rites from a god? Especially one whom you know is willing to do terrible things to you? I will add that the Homeric Hymn to Ares shows a much more favorable view. Also, you have such myths as that the Areopagus, which ...


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In the myth of Alcestis, she actually did come back to life, whether rescued by Heracles or sent back by Persephone, but no questions about her body are raised -- somehow, just being saved from Death made her corporeal again, in spite of already having a tomb. Given that Eurydice didn't actually make it back, they probably would not have raised the question ...


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