6

It varies in different tales. The Hawaiian Romance Of Laieikawai contains numerous references to Nuu-mea-lani being in the air (emphasis mine): A terrible sight to Mokukelekahiki to see that lizard; he flew away up to Nuumealani, the Raised Place in the Heavens; Then Kaeloikamalama flew down with Mokukelekahiki from the heights of Nuumealani, the land in ...


5

As mentions by @bleh in a comment, Hawaiian Mythology by Martha Warren Beckwith (1940) seems like a good start. In the references section of this book you will find a large amount of books/scholarly articles on polynesian and hawaiian mythology. Among the hawaiian references, some names of scholars pop up frequently: those of Joseph S. Emerson and ...


2

Hina depending on where you get the story could be the grandmother in other Polynesian cultures, but Hina yes in Hawaiian mythology Hina is Maui's mother. You can see relations of Maui to Hina in this story by W. D. Westervelt in Legends of Maui: http://www.sacred-texts.com/pac/maui/maui04.htm


1

Well you could read the Kumulipo, Papa and Wākea werenʻt the first beings, but Pō and I think Laʻilaʻi. If you want a simpler shorter version starting with Papa (Earth mother) and Wākea (Sky Father) this is what I learned from my kumu: I think Rangi is not part of the Hawaiian version. Hāloa is the first man who all Hawaiians descended from and this is why ...


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