10

Hephaestus’ ugly appearance and lameness is taken by some to represent peripheral neuropathy and skin cancer resulting from arsenicosis caused by arsenic exposure from metalworking. Bronze age smiths added arsenic to copper to produce harder arsenical bronze, especially during periods of tin scarcity. Many Bronze Age smiths would have suffered from chronic ...


4

I've done some preliminary research, and found nothing on Thaleia. This is one of those wonderful little "mythical myths" where the only sources are secondary: all we know of this nymph comes from a mention in ancient text "The Life of Aeschylus" with no author attributed. The mention is apparently in relation to a lost play of Aeschylus. So that's all ...


3

Probably yes. Several writers, including Homer and Hesiod, mention that Hephaistos married Aglaea, one of the three Charites. It is not entirely clear whether this happened before or after his marriage to Aphrodite, I could not find a source that explicitly mentions the order of Hephaistos's marriages. There's also a possibility that a second marriage ...


2

We don't really know... although I have a theory. Several ancient sources mention this nymph Thaleia (or Thalia) but only one, Stephanus of Byzantium, s.v. Palikê, says anything about her parentage. One of the dozens of the lost works of the playwright Aeschylus is mentioned by other authors using so many different versions of its title that there is a ...


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