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5

Hesiod describes the Five Ages in his poem Works and Days (lines 109 - 201) 1. Their order is: Golden Age, ruled by Cronus, Silver Age, when Zeus rule begins, Bronze Age, an age of tough men that ends with the flood of Deucalion, Heroic Age, when the Trojan War occurs, Iron Age, the current age. Hesiod does not mention a future age past his own, which ...


4

This is an interesting idea. At least Ovid appears to take up the prophecy. After narrating the Gold-Bronze Ages, he quickly glides over the Gigantomachy and then discusses the great flood of Deucalion which Jupiter sent down because of Lycaon's acts (1.177-380). Plato also embeds the idea in his treatment of it in the Republic. There, Socrates, after ...


3

I believe this version is a bit more illuminating. Grey at birth seems to imply by the surrounding text to mean a belief they are mature before their time. Thereafter, would that I were not among the men of the fifth generation, but either had died before or been born afterwards. For now truly is a race of iron, and men never rest from labour and sorrow ...


2

It is not actually the end times, as there is no universal apocalypse in the Greek canon (so far as I know,) but only a cleansing of the world of the evil race of men. Ovid is probably the best explicator. Zeus, throughly freaked out with his run in with the original "Hannibal Lecter" (Lycaon), in fear of his own continued dominion over the earth in the ...


1

In short, you're expecting too much. It's always a mistake to expect mythology to be internally consistent. Mythology is not a fantasy novel or an RPG, with consistent worldbuilding and character development. What we have instead are a variety of fragments, the ones that have survived millennia of history, recopying, and reinterpretation through the ages, ...


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