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47

Common Ancestry Both the Ancient Greeks and Romans were descended from Proto-Indo-Europeans. While the two groups had diverged, they continued to share remnants of a common language and other features including mythology. The most obvious sign of this is the chief deities of their respective pantheons: Zeus and Jupiter: both derive from the Proto-Indo-...


40

According to Paul McDonald at the University of Wolverhampton, it's this 3900-year-old one, from 1900BC in Sumeria: Something which has never occurred since time immemorial: a young woman did not fart in her husband’s lap. (I don't get it either!)


9

Definitely dynamic. In Burkert's "Graechische Religion..." (Intro/2: sources), we can find the following reasons: - as there were no holy scriptures there was no "canon" whatsoever to tell apart "canonical" myths from "non-canonical" - myths were continuously being rewritten, as poets were composing new hymns to the gods for celebrations or contests. In ...


9

Romans had little mythology of their own before meeting with other civilizations. One of the many aspects they were lacking, cultural wise, that they borrowed from Greece (and other civilizations). Thus they inherited many (or the lot) of ancient greek mythology which led to their existing Gods getting many of the characteristics of the Ancient greek ones. ...


8

Jesus is the Medieval Latin spelling of Iesus (the 'i' is consonantal), itself derived from the Greek Ἰησοῦς, as bleh noted, which transcribed in Latin characters would be Iesous, close to your Iseous (which does not otherwise exist as a name). The name is ultimately Semitic, and came into Greek as the Aramaic שׁוּעַ (Yeshua), from the Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (...


8

No, at least not that we know of. If there was a monotheistic cult in ancient Greece, it certainly wasn't as popular as Atenism. There are traces of monotheistic thought in Platonism (e.g. the Euthyphro dilemma), but that's more about philosophy than religion. There's one theory, put forth by Elizabeth Kessler in Dionysian Monotheism in Nea Paphos that "two ...


7

This is the dove with a halo, as a christian symbol for the Holy Spirit or the soul. The colour red is associated with the blood of Christ and with the Holy Spirit. The fact that you bought it in Italy (Rome) supports this, as there is a big christian community as well as many pilgrims and tourists visiting Rome and Vatican City.


7

Dynamic: I could also imagine that the stories were more naturally developed, like an on-going ad hoc collection of stories. A scenario where anyone could just make up a myth/god and where the popular ones got picked up and written down? The time constants you are contemplating are way off, in my opinion. Long before written records gods and their histories ...


6

Well, this assumes that Campbell is accurate! Campbell is playing fast, loose, and vague with the evidence, but that's a different story. The ancients as far as I am aware did not recognize Campbell's "monomyth." They did, however, recognize a few things. First, at least with Mediterranean and Near Eastern cultures, they all engaged in a process of ...


6

Hinduism is generally considered to have begun around 500-200 BCE. Hinduism was formed from a combination of other traditions, in what is often referred to as the "Hindu Synthesis" or "Brahmanic Synthesis". This formative process is counted as lasting into the beginning of the Gupta Empire, around 320 CE. (see The Religious Traditions of Asia: Religion, ...


6

The Romans thought that the Greek gods needed some changes, and adopted them to settle religious feuds. The Romans took Athena's power as a war goddess and took that away, which made the Greeks extremely angry. Athena had been the patron of Athens. The Greeks respected the might of the Romans, but were a bit angry with their changing the gods personalities....


5

Before we can derive the meaning behind the word, we need to first understand where the term originates. These sages can be considered philosophers that use their wisdom to help shape the foundation of Chinese culture, society, and even politics. But is that all? Because much of Eastern Asian culture, language, and philosophy were borrowed from the Chinese ...


5

Since the V.M. has been extensively studied, as far as its physical properties go, I don't think much can be said for "mythical origins" of the book. It's known to be old and most likely made in Europe somewhere. A reasonable chain of ownership has been established for at least some stretches of the book's existence. Its origins and history are thus more ...


4

The term sage usually seems to be a translation of the character: 聖 (simplified: 圣, Pinyin: shèng) Or a combination of it with other characters. Sun Wukong's title in Journey to the West, for instance, is 齊天大聖, and is translated "Great Sage, Equal of Heaven" (or similar), where 大聖 is the "Great Sage" bit (大 for large, great). So, what does the character 聖 ...


4

There are plenty of stories out there of Greek gods being fought and defeated! In Greek mythology, gods were often fought by both other gods and mortals. The mortal Arachne soundly defeated Athena the demigod Heracles killed a number of Poseidon’s sons Hades kidnapped the god Persephone to become his wife the great mortal hero Diomedes injured Aphrodite and ...


4

If I have understood your question correctly, you wish to know of examples of cultures that accepted the existence of gods other than their own? Before the advent of Christianity, and even for a good while afterwards, this was the norm, at least in most areas. Cultures would meet, mingle and if the gods were similar enough (had similar domains) then they ...


4

The scientific method is only a few centuries old at most. Before that, you need to remember that most people were illiterate, and universities or indiviual researchers were driven (or at least influenced) by religion. Retributions for disagreeing with official religious dogma were severe in the Middle Ages when the power of the church was at its highest. ...


4

The Mosaic myth is composed out of a multitude of older stories: the story of the infant Moses's salvation from the Nile is based on an earlier legend of king Sargon of Akkad the story of the parting of the Red Sea is based on Mesopotamian creation mythology the Covenant Code (the law code in Exodus 20:22–23:33) has similarities in both content and ...


4

Seth and Sekhen/Ka are completely unrelated names & meanings. Below are the names of Ka (left) and his queen Ha (right): There are also inscriptions presenting an upright serekh with an upside-down Ka-symbol inside, which renders "Sekhen". Sekhen means "to grasp, to hold". Ka means "to embrace". Because the up/down reading ...


3

When you say 4 elements I assume you mean the Aristotelian elements: earth, water, fire and air. Aristotle also posited a fifth element: aether. from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_element#Greece In his On Generation and Corruption,[22][23] Aristotle related each of the four elements to two of the four sensible qualities: Fire is both hot ...


3

Try "Goetia" instead of "Goethia". Roughly, it means the art of summoning angels, whether fallen or still elevated (though more commonly the former). The Ars Goetia is the first section of The Lesser Key of Solomon. Basically, it lists the demons (with various titles of nobility and royalty) supposedly captured and bound by Solomon. Crowley and another ...


3

The religious phenomenon has, in my opinion, this structure: This structure is not necessarily true for every religious phenomena, here i try to draw a common line that can be followed A goddess, related to earth, prosperity, etc A god, related to sky, with all the attributes, because a god that "lives in the sky" has power over the clouds, the winds, the ...


3

If anything early Christianity was well influenced by ancient Jewish culture of the day, including both Jewish laws, traditions, scriptures and mythology. For the most part both the New and Old Testament are rich sources from which Christians draw their doctrine of hell as a place of punishment and the place of demons. This was also influenced a number of ...


3

The story of Jesus Christ. Came to save the world, but the same people killed him


3

Yes, it is possible, and has been done. The GML Compilation I would say the handiest resource available for this online is the "Mythical Chronology Chart" page on Carlos Parada's website the Greek Mythology Link (GML). As further explained on the afore-linked page (q.v.), The chart does not establish precise historical dates, but shows the ...


2

Perhaps for something to be mythology it needs some superhuman or extra-human element, otherwise it's classed as a story or tale? For instance, I don't think I've seen the Tale of the Eloquent Peasant described as a myth. But it might fit as a tale of everyday humanity.


2

In the Indian Vedas there is handsome history about that. It is described in Bhagavad-Gita. The Bhagavad-Gita is considered by eastern and western scholars alike to be among the greatest spiritual books the world has ever known. In a very clear and wonderful way the Supreme Lord Krishna describes the science of self-realization and the exact process by ...


2

Leprechauns aren't a great option in that they're highly location dependent. Of course if your story is entirely set in Ireland that's no problem, but if you want to be anywhere else, no leprechauns. Their gold is not magical, it's treasure buried during an ancient war that they happen to know the location of. All you need to do is dig at the bottom of the ...


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