7

Going by the commonest references in Ancient Greek literature and the closest associations in Ancient Greek religion, the best candidate for this particular hymn's addressee would appear to be Rhea, but specifically as filtered through her identification with the ambiguous Phrygian deity Kybele [Cybele] (or a perhaps pre-Hellenic goddess who would become ...


7

That is a good question. There were several springs on Mt. Helicon, and I suspect the answer is connected to them. I found an interesting suggestion under "Hippocampus" in Wikipedia: The appearance of hippocampi in both freshwater and saltwater is counter-intuitive to a modern audience, though not to an ancient one. The Greek picture of the natural ...


2

"Athena-ish" Ares? In the mythology, beyond the fact that Ares is a great-nephew of Themis (since she is a sister of his grandparents Kronos [Cronus] and Rhea), the Titan-goddess never interacts with this god. And the Ares in this hymn is indeed so incongruous with the character we do encounter in the mythology as to seem an entirely different personage, as ...


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