12

Amurru, an Amorite deity often referred to as a storm-god, is depicted on ancient cylinder seals carrying a curved object called, in Akkadian, a gamlu, which is generally interpreted as a shepherd's crook, e.g. by writers such as Henri Frankfort (in his 1939 book Cylinder Seals: A Documentary Essay on the Art and Religion of the Ancient Near East), Aïcha ...


9

Thalia, the Greek muse of comedy, is also often seen holding a shepherd's crook, as in this picture. As DisturbedNeo said, in Egyptian mythology it (along with a flail) is held by pharaohs as symbols of power, and is thus held by Osiris as a "pharaoh of the dead".


9

The Egyptian God Osiris is generally depicted holding a Shephard's Crook. It is also held by Pharaoh's as proof of their right of kingship.


6

I'm afraid the stars do not have mythological significance. According to the listing for the painting on the Prado Museum website, the stars are probably the planet Saturn, whose rings were believed to be satellites at the time: The stars in the firmament above the cruel old man remind us that Saturn is also the name given, back in antiquity, to the ...


5

Dog and Cat deities were worshiped together as early as the Second Dynasty (2890 BCE) in the forms of Anubis and Bastet, but the recorded worship of Anubis dates back to even the First Dynasty (3100 BCE). Bastet's worship centered around the city of Bubastis, while Anubis took a central role in the afterlife as ruler of the underworld until this reign was ...


5

Hitherto Unknown Names; & Issues with Scale As far as I can tell, by and large, what this art-form's contribution has been is pretty much just the addition to the mythology of a handful of stories and personages unattested in literature, e.g. there are a few Gigantes who fight against the gods and whose names do not occur in any currently extant ancient ...


5

I don't think it would be possible to know for certain unless we ask the artist who drew it, but the symbol looks like a very simplified version of the Chinese taijitu, the "yin and yang symbol":


4

In modern Wicca, this staff is called "The Stang". In its simplest form, a forked staff, Witches use the Stang in various ways including representing the Horned One, aiding in spirit flight, and directing energy.


3

If you read the book "Divine Love Astrology: Revealing Spiritual Truth for Personal Transformation" it briefly mentions the following. The symbol for Cancer represents a crab's claws and also symbolizes the yin and yang or the male and the female joined in the fertilized egg. Cancer I believe has often been viewed as very carrying so maybe this has ...


3

I found a small example in the Wikipedia article for Achilles, under the section Achilles, Ajax and a game of petteia: Numerous paintings on pottery have suggested a tale not mentioned in the literary traditions. At some point in the war, Achilles and Ajax were playing a board game (petteia). They were absorbed in the game and oblivious to the ...


2

Apparently, the Egyptians believed all vultures to be female and thus strongly associated them with maternity. This belief gave birth to Nekhbet, the mother of mothers: As its name suggests, the Egyptian Vulture was the sacred animal of the ancient Pharaohs; its appearance is immortalized in the Egyptian hieroglyphic alphabet as the letter A. Since the ...


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