13

The plant Gilgamesh found was not a lotus (emphasis mine) So Utanapishtim revealed to Gilgamesh another secret of the gods. Under the sea there is a wondrous plant, like a flower with thorns, that will return a man to his youth. Gilgamesh then opened the conduit, tied stones to his feet, plunged into the deep (Apsu), and retrieved the plant. source: ...


8

Probably not. According to Apollodorus, [VI. ZEUS CONFIRMS THE DIVINE PRIVILEGES OF HERMES.] And Zeus made Hermes his personal herald and messenger of the gods beneath the earth." It says that Zeus had to make him into his personal herald, and messenger, but there's no way that [II. HERMES STEALS APOLLO'S CATTLE.] Though he was laid out in ...


7

tl;dr: Not rare at all. Complications The answer to this is fairly soft, as it will depend considerably on what you consider a 'god' and what constitutes 'dying' - neither of which are particularly straightforward. First of all, what is a god? This is not trivial; in some circles the idea of a god dying is nonsense, because the definition of a god ...


6

Sun Wukong used multiple methods. These included gobbling up a bunch of Laozi's elixer pills, gobbling down all of the magic peaches before the big banquet he wasn't invited to, and slugging down all of the Jade Emperor's wine. (Although he was sort of an immortal before all that, having been born from a magic stone representing the merger of Heaven and ...


6

The information about the Plant of Everlasting Youth form the Sumerian mythos can be found on the second half of The Epic of Gilgamesh. In the Tablet eleven Utnapishtim's wife asks her husband to offer a parting gift to Gilgamesh, so he learns that at the bottom of the sea there lives a boxthorn-like plant that will make him young again (Note: there ...


4

Since your examples are Greek, I presume your focus is exclusively on that mythology. Dionysus and his maternal relatives, such as his mother, aunts, uncles, cousins and his grandparents Cadmus and Harmonia (as well as his great-uncle Iasion), have a mysterious and ambiguous relationship with immortality (and mortality). Almost all these characters acquire ...


4

Some members of this list count as gods, although none are, to my knowledge, regarded as true Olympians. While all gained immortality, I'm only counting a select few as gods because they were either venerated by a large group of people or recognized by other immortals as gods. Some notables: Glaucus: Originally a fisherman, he ate a "divine herb" from ...


4

Well, they were forced into Tartarus. And amongst the foremost Kottos (Cottus) and Briareos (Briareus) and Gyes insatiate for war raised fierce fighting : three hundred rocks, one upon another, they launched from their strong hands and overshadowed the Titanes with their missiles, and buried them beneath the wide-pathed earth, and bound them in bitter ...


4

Legend of the White Snake is definitely worth mentioning, as it is one of the most well known Chinese folk tales. Madame Whitesnake has been the subject of numerous traditional operas, and widely fictionalized in all narrative mediums. "Lü Dongbin, one of the Eight Immortals, disguises himself as a man selling treats at the Broken Bridge near the West Lake ...


4

Here is a list of how the 8 Immortals did it: He Xiangu "When she was about 14 or 15, a divine personage appeared to her in a dream and instructed her to eat powdered mica so that her body might become etherealised and immune from death. She did as instructed and also vowed to remain a virgin. She also gradually decreased her food intake. One day she ...


2

Here is another time Apollo was made mortal. After Zeus found out Apollo possessed the full gift of prophesy, he asked him which woman would give birth to the kid that would over throw him as king. Apollo backed away and said, "No can tell pops." Zeus got so angry, he was made mortal. The next time Apollo was made mortal, Asclepius (as a demigod) brought ...


2

In addition to the above, a God who dies can simply become a god of the dead. In the Greek mythology, there's Persephone, in Norse there's Baldur. (Note however, that both became secondary in the role, joining the prior "birthright" lords of the dead.)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible