13

The Aboriginal people are protective of their culture, and they do not share all of their stories with the rest of the world. For them, much of what transpired is a private matter, and so only some stories can be accessed. (Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories - Jukurrpa, Gadi Mirrabooka Aboriginal Stories, The Australian Aboriginal "Dreamtime" (Its History, ...


10

Australian Aboriginal myths in some regards are a little unique in the sense that many of their creatures are derived from the traditions of Aboriginal Dreamtime. A word of caution: many of these creatures are derived from the traditions of Aboriginal Dreamtime. To understand them, the reader must have a decent understanding of what the Aboriginal ...


9

An article in The Sydney Morning Herald has the creator of Cleverman, Ryan Griffen, discussing the traditional Aboriginal role of the Cleverman. The article paints a picture of the Cleverman as a shaman of sorts, an elder and master of magic within a local community. Griffen states "Our cleverman is different from the actual cleverman that existed in ...


9

There are a number of explanations that have been provided for it. It seems that which is correct depends on the location and storyteller. Attempting to come to a single conclusion that can be generally agreed upon seems to be impossible: The attempt to find a tradition what is recognized by the whole tribal community has unfortunately come to nothing. ...


8

They walked. They seem to be able to move independently. According to a wondjina artist, they walk, and travel, as the rain does. Long Watty says Wandjina came from ground, live in clouds, rain comes after he lift cloud, rain go down. Rain travels as the Wandjina walks - Wandjina travels. Then Wandjina goes down with rain (or as rain?) and into ground ...


8

A whole book has been written about the Cleverman, title Aboriginal Men Of High Degree by A.P. Elkin. Elkin was a anthropologist who actually lived with the tribes to get the knowledge. The Cleverman has the power of weather control, curing illness, hypnotism, the strong eye, visiting the Sky-world and so much more. He has magical powers of invisibility, ...


7

First, I took a look at Wikipedia. It explains that the Rainbow Serpent may have been inspired by one or more of the following Australian snakes: The rough-scaled python The taipan The file snake These snakes could inspire cultures across the continent. Research tells me that the rough-scaled python is active in a small area of Western Australia, though ...


5

Haha. great question on modern mythology! (I'd never even heard of the Hawkesbury River Monster.) You might want to look into the ideas of Carl Jung regarding archetypes. He wrote a book Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Sky which has been misrepresented by UFOlogists as a validation of beliefs regarding extra-terrestrials, but is ...


4

TL;DR He kills the hunter just because he hates and likes eating humans. The sisters defeat him by luring him into a cave and then burning the entrance. A version of the story can be found on Myths and Legends of the Australian Aborigines, by W. Ramsay Smith. Unfortunately, the page isn't available in google books: In the long long ago, in a cave in the ...


2

The snake as a symbol for creation is common across many cultures mythologies. The mythologist Joseph Campbell pointed out that The serpent sheds its skin to be born again ... it lives by killing and eating itself, casting off death and being reborn, like the moon


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