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12

Hulking out is a fairly appropriate comparison to the riastrad, or warp spasm, as Kinsella put it, but far more monstrous than just green-tinged and well-muscled. Massively muscled, lower legs twisted around backward, one eye sucked into his head, the other eye having fallen outward, cheeks peeled away from his mouth to reveal his jaw, his own internal ...


11

Láeg may have been a descendant of the Tuatha Dé Danann. His father Riangabar may have been one of the fairy folk, sidhe, a later version of the Tuatha Dé Danann. This would explain why he would be exempted from Macha's curse. Cu Chulainn, the hero of the chief epic Tain Bo Cuailnge ("The Cattle-Raid of Cooley"), whose father is alternately made out to be ...


10

Celtic refers to any of the peoples who spoke Celtic languages, and this includes France, parts of Germany and Austria, and northern Italy. The peoples of Ireland and Britain are called Insular Celts, because they live on islands off the European coastline. And no, they did not believe in the same gods, although you can often find similar types of gods and ...


10

According to a poem by MacLeigh which can be found and discussed in The Annuals of the Four Masters They fled to Connaught and having seized power from the Milesians in the 1st century ruled there until the 3rd century, when Aodh son of Garadh King of Connaught and last king of the Fir Bolg was defeated by Cormac king of Ireland. The Fir Bolg ...


9

Turn your cloaks / For fairy folks / Are in old oaks - Old English saying I couldn't find a definitive explanation of why this legend happens. What I have ascertained is that it turns up absolutely everywhere, not just in Irish stories. I have found a few quotes that begin to offer a reason (although, I have to say, not a hugely satisfying one). The main ...


8

Fergus didn't offer only to retreat in battle himself. He promised to retreat with the men of Erin in tow. From 19. The Battle Of Fergus And Cuchulain (emphasis mine) "...give way before me this day in the presence of the men of Erin!" "Truly I am loath to do that," answered Cuchulain, "to flee before any one man on the Cattle-...


7

What appears to have happened is a 20th Century conflation of two different legends, one involving leprechauns and gold and another involving rainbows and gold. There is really no evidence associating leprechauns with rainbows before the 20th century. (A different answer quotes a Time magazine article from 1952). The sole folklore-related Google Books ...


7

While it certainly seems to explain the existence of certain hills at the time, there isn't any known landmark to attach this event to. The battle strongly appears to have taken place in Westmeath, between Athlone and Mullingar, but the hills in question don't seem to be identified. After attempting collect a bunch of references to known locations of the ...


7

Check out: Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland by Thomas Crofton Croker http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/39752 The Brothers Grimm translated Crokers Fairy Legends and provided a summary in the beginning of their translation. Below is what they said, loosely translated and paraphrased: Fairies always live in large groups, never alone or in ...


6

Medb, the queen, had previously offered Ferdiad great rewards: And when Ferdiad was come into the camp, he was honoured and waited on, and choice, well-flavoured strong liquor was poured out for him till he became drunken and merry. Great rewards were promised him if he would make the fight and combat, namely a chariot worth four times seven bondmaids, ...


6

There are several arguments in favour of the characters in Irish and Welsh myths being deities rather than heroic mortals. One is etymology: if the Irish champion Ogma has a name similar to that of the Gaulish god Ogmios, for example, then we can assume that he may also have been a god. This is true for many Irish and Welsh "deities", including Danu, Brigit, ...


5

From livescience.com In his collection of Irish fairy and folk tales, W.B. Yeats offered an 18th-century poem by William Allingham titled "The Lepracaun; Or, Fairy Shoemaker" which describes the sound: Lay your ear close to the hill. Do you not catch the tiny clamour, Busy click of an elfin hammer, Voice of the Lepracaun singing ...


4

This has always been a painful area in philology for several reasons: In many cases, verses in the original text can have several inferred meanings. For some languages and cultures, this is actually part of the tradition. For example, in Literary Chinese, each verse of the Tao Te Ching can be translated in several ways, each with a significantly different ...


4

1) Who is Scáthach? Scáthach is the warrior woman who varyingly lives in the 'east of the world' who Cú Chulainn is sent to train with: Then Domnall said that Cuchulind would not have profession of instruction until he came to Scathach, who was in the east of Alba. So the three of them went across Alba, viz. Cuchulind, and Conchobar, the king of ...


3

According to Ancient Origins Leprechauns are now understood to be the fairy tales of the past and fanciful stories to tell when one sees a rainbow. I'm afraid I can't find anything else either. It may have been associated after Christianity came to Ireland, the rainbow being associated with the end of the great flood as told in the Genesis, and ...


2

It is tradition that tells us that St. Patrick banished all the snakes out of Ireland. The fact is that Ireland never had any snakes to be banished! So what is this legend trying to tell us? St. Patrick rid Ireland of the serpentine snake of paganism to say the least. No Snakes in Ireland The St. Patrick mythology includes the claim that he banished ...


2

I basically answer this question from the sources in another question here so I'll modify it for your question. Aoife is a warrior woman who Cú's teacher Scáthach seems to have an ongoing feud with: At that time also Scathach had a feud against other tribes, over whom was the princess Aife. ... she was afraid of Aiffe, because she was the hardest ...


2

I recall that Scathach taught martial arts to Cú Chulainn on the Isle of Skye. Wikipedia confirms this: Scáthach (Scottish Gaelic: Sgàthach an Eilean Sgitheanach), or Sgathaich, is a figure in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. She is a legendary Scottish warrior woman and martial arts teacher who trains the legendary Ulster hero Cú Chulainn in the ...


2

I think there may be something to the Govinda idea, and the "white/wise" also links her to the Irish hero Finn, whose enlightenment came about because of her transgression. Her wisdom could also come from being a river-goddess, like the Indian Saraswati and Persian Anahita were also goddesses of abundance, wisdom, and rivers. Either way, I do feel she has a ...


1

I think the answer is that they hide their gold where no one can find it - as an article in Time magazine puts it: Irish folklore described leprechauns as crotchety, solitary, yet mischievous creatures. They were said to be shoemakers who socked away their profits in pots at the end of rainbows, or scattered them around in mountains, forests, or ...


1

I wonder if it's because he and his "son" are in Co. Meath at the time. They were watching out for Medb's army at Iraird Cuilenn (Crossakiel, County Meath), not in Ulster. Another explanation might be that after he sets out to warn the Ulstermen, first they don't heed him, then he accidentally dies, after which his head continues to warn them, and they ...


1

It is interesting to note that these rivers, as well as other sunken places, are mentioned in Patrick Sims-Williams's Irish Influence on Medieval Welsh Literature, p192ff. (Findable at Google Books.) The chapter mentions other places that seem to have been known dry land locations that had flooded within historical or literary memory (one got uncovered ...


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