18

They are not really the same. In fact, they are not both fox spirits with nine tails. Left: A nine-tailed fox depicted in the ancient Chinese bestiary Classic of Mountains and Seas (山海經) | Right: A distinctly single tailed kitsune depicted in the Japanese almanac kin mou zui (訓蒙図彙) The fox spirits of later Chinese traditions do not necessarily have nine ...


15

1966 was a hinoe-uma (丙午) year. This does not come from "crossing zodiac with elements" per se, but is instead a specific combination of celestial stem and earthly branch in the traditional sexagenary dating system. Both the stem hinoe (丙) and branch uma (午) belonged to the element of fire. This overabundance of fieriness informs the astrological ...


13

We know they existed, but not much else. In fact, none other than the Kojiki itself states that its stories are collected from contemporary works (which have all been lost). This is because the Kojiki was a compilation. It was the product of a royal effort to collect "historical" texts in circulation at the time, to edit into a relatively coherent narrative....


11

It wasn't the flayed horse that Amaterasu-ōmikami was offended by, per se. According to the kojiki (古事記), what happened was that Susano'o flayed a beautiful spotted horse and threw it into a room where Amaterasu's weavers were making clothes. In the ensuing shock and chaos, one of the weaving girls was impaled on a shuttle (through her private parts...) and ...


9

Based on this really neat family tree of the Emperors of Japan, I count 84 generations between Amaterasu and the incumbent Emperor Akihito (whose reign began in 1990). As a descendant of the first Emperor Jimmu, Akihito traces himself quite directly back to the "kami [divinity] who shines in the sky." Jimmu was a great-great-great-grandson of Amaterasu, the ...


7

'The Cult of the Fox' by Xiaofei Kang, is a good reflection on how the 'Huxian'/'Huli Jing' myths predate the popular kitsune myth, and shows the establishment of a lot of the concepts taken for granted by pop-cultural depictions today, such as foxes feeding on human essence, associating with ghosts, or taking human form. There is also some brief mention ...


7

Tengu (天狗) A lot of my knowledge about them comes from the oral tradition, but the Wiki makes an interesting point that they were originally regarded as demons in the Buddhist context. In the Shinto contexts, they were simply yōkai (妖怪). Tengu are often thought of as a type of forest goblin, and may be benefactors or adversaries, which is typical of ...


7

These evil supernatural beings are known collectively as the kunne kamuy or wen kamuy, lit. "dark spirits" or "evil spirits", respectively. They are referred to as kamuy because it is considered more polite than calling them demons to their faces. It is always good to call any being politely as kamuy. Then its soul would be pleased and won't do any harm ...


6

The Dakini connection Here is an extract of Chinese Magical Medicine by Michel Strickmann implying the direct connection between the Inari and the Dakini (p. 272). The “Dakini” or “Dagini” for which this complex of modern Japanese possession-rites is named is, of course, the dakini of older Tantric sources, identified since at least the ...


5

As I understand it, Izanagi is the original ruler of Yomi, however, when Susanoo was banished there, he became ruler. Texts on Yomi are very scarce, and finding out exactly how he became ruler, and what later became of Izanagi, remain scarce. I'll do some investigating soon for you.


4

Not sure what you are looking for but you have: Mitford's tale from old Japan. A book from 1870 (something like that) collected by an Englishman, Algernon Miltford, one of the very first European truly in love with Japanese culture. This book is full of fairly good stories. An example is the 47 ronins an incredibly popular story. There is a movie with Keanu ...


4

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-Fairy-Tales-Antique-Illustrated-Japan-Legends-14-1898-Hasegawa-Stories-/232065349086 I have often seen these kinds of antique Japanese fairy tale picture books, often written in English. The stories are fascinating, and they're nicely illustrated. And they seem readily available for purchase online. You might also try ...


4

The Kojiki of Shinto states the origins of mankind as an action of Izanami-no-Mikoto: Izanami started his cleansing rites and in doing so he created the Goddess of the seas and the Goddess of the moon by washing his left and right eyes. He then created the God of storms out of his nostril and after all this was done he created the first humans. I ...


4

The Yamata no Orochi (八岐大蛇) is actually ‘the flood myth’ of Japan. The 8 heads of Orochi are actually 8 rivers. Can’t remember the source, will update again if possible.


4

The only locus classicus I can think of for the notion of a soul-mate is Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium 189c–193d, which does spin a kind of myth to account for it (and for human sexual love more generally, both homo- and heterosexual). But I don't think anyone pretends that it was ever established in communal or tribal oral ...


4

This reminded me of the unique "Kill Bill" (Vols. I & II) movies. Found the following on Pinterest: Pai Mei played by Kung Fu movie legend Gordon Liu in Kill Bill - character is based off of the villain White Lotus with Gordon Liu as the hero. It was a 1980 Shaw Brothers Kung Fu film called Fist of the White Lotus. In that movie after delivering ...


4

Kitsune in Japanese mythology fall into one of two categories: 善狐 zenko, literally "good foxes" 野狐 yako, literally "foxes of the fields" Zenk are benevolent, celestial foxes associated with the god Inari; they are sometimes simply called Inari foxes. Even if they do not have nine tails they are always depicted as being white of color. There are many ...


3

The Wyandot Indians have an origin myth for sun showers. Then the Thunder spoke again to the young woman and said,  "I have now taken him along with me, and whenever it rains while the sun is shining, the people shall think and say that Tsi-ju'Q-Q, the Wyandot, is making the rain." http://www.wyandot.org/sunshower.htm Snopes has an array of sun shower ...


3

My understanding of the Japanese tea ceremony is that it arose out of the Zen tradition, which has no gods. However, I did find mention of a Japanese kami associated with tea, Inari Ōkami. There is also god of tea, Lu Yu, author of The Classic of Tea, in Chinese folklore, .


3

This legend is found in the Kojiki, the oldest "history book" from Japan. The original text makes the reason quite plain: because Izanami is a woman. 告其妹曰「女人先言、不良」 . . . 「因女先言而不良」 He then told his sister, "The woman speaking first is bad" . . . [they copulated anyway and then consulted the gods, who advised:] . . . "It was bad because the woman ...


3

One belief is that when a kitsune changes shape, its hoshi no tama holds a portion of its magical power. Another tradition is that the pearl represents the kitsune's soul; the kitsune will die if separated from it for long. Those who obtain the ball may be able to extract a promise from the kitsune to help them in exchange for its return This is what the ...


2

As an addendum: While kitsune are associated with Japanese Shinto deities Inari and Ukanomitama, as well as the Buddhist-originated Dakini-ten; Huxian or Huli Jing are, meanwhile, associated with the Chinese deities Nüwa and Xi Wangmu. Daji has also been venerated to some extent as a sort of divine entity of her own accord, and the Huxian is also directly ...


2

Amateratsu is traditionnaly the spouse of her very own brother Tsukuyomi. You can check Wikipedia. In case of Inari he was married with Ukemochi and after Tsukuyomi slain her he married Mitama (Uga-no-Mitama). Note also that Inari is vastly renown to have both a male and female form and those spouses are much more the "traditionally in some myths" spouses ...


2

That reads to me like an embellished, Western take on the common "fox wife" stories ubiquitous in Japanese folklore. The prototypical version of this theme appears in the 8th century nihon ryōiki (日本霊異記), i.e. Chronicles of Supernatural Tales of Japan. In this tale, the protagonist went out searching for a wife, and found a beautiful girl looking for a ...


2

Re: Why "august" It's a function of translation into European languages. It comes from the Latin usage: augustus and was a title employed initially by Octavian, who was deified after his death. I'm not finding anything on Amaterasu referencing mortal beginnings, so we can probably discard the Roman association with deified rulers, and focus on the literal ...


2

Initially, Susanoo ruled the Takama no Hara (High Celestial Plain) with his sister Amaterasu but from the very beginning, Susanoo caused trouble by destroying forests and mountains and killing local inhabitants down on earth. For this reason he was banished from heaven. ... Full of exuberant joy at having won his challenge with his sister, Susanoo went ...


2

Amaterasu or Amaterasu-ōmikami is one of the major deities in the animistic Shinto religion of Japan; her full name means “Great Divinity Illuminating Heaven.” One of the world’s few female solar deities, a principal myth featuring Amaterasu depicts her conflict with her brother, Susanoo, god of storms and the sea. Angered with Susanoo because he threw a ...


2

As you know, the highlight of the ritual is throwing beans at the oni. This specific activity is known as mame (魔滅), meaning "to destroy the demon" (魔を滅する, ma wo mes suru). Alternatively, mame can also be rendered as 魔目, meaning "demon's eyes". So to shoot the demon's eyes is mame wo iru (魔目を射る). The Japanese word for beans is mame (豆), and to roast beans ...


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