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Possible You don't mention any specific characteristics, specific dates or specific references so it's impossible to determine any real connexion between folkloristic iconography and some real instance(s) of antisemitism. That said, one can speculate. From the 21st century perspective, we could say: "Well, Dwarves love gold and the Jews run the banking ...


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Antisemitism is almost as old as Christianity itself, and because the churches dominated every aspect of life and death, the folkloric and the religious aspects are so intertwined they are almost indistinguishable. An example of this would be the Passion Plays: Over the course of time, Christians began to accept... that the Jewish people as a whole were ...


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This answer will only address the choices from the standpoint of precedent. (There are likely mystical reasons for the precise numbers, but that would be the subject of an answer all it's own, and constitutes a bit of a rabbit hole.) 40 days (and sometimes nights) recurs in many significant passages in the Old and New Testament. The age of the ...


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Sadan's article is discussed in depth here. Yiddish is a thousand-year-old Jewish language, with origins, according to a broad scholarly consensus, in the German Rhineland. The major component of Yiddish, in both its Western and Eastern varieties, is Middle High German, with varying admixtures of Slavic, Hebrew, and other languages. There are many words that ...


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I think the answer to your question is no. Folklore is created primarily for the ears of children and would consist of imagery relevant to the culture of the area. By culture I mean natural aspects, type of landscape, textiles created from available materials, manners of speaking and daily rituals. First of all I don't see any close connection between the ...


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These characters were created, like all mythological creatures, as a metaphor for somebody. Long after those people disappeared, Jews appeared and like most immigrants became the subject of negative imagery. The long story is complicated.


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Perhaps the age of three years in these cloven-hoofed animals is a reflection of the fact that at this age they are past puberty, yet not fully grown. Capable of bearing young, but not completely mature. Close to a certain "purity", but valuable for their birthing properties as well. And it would not be a sacrifice if it were not valuable. And ...


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Adding to @DukeZhou's answer, why these specific animals - these are the same animals that Abraham used in the earlier Book of Genesis, 15:9: "He answered, “Bring Me a three-year-old heifer, a three-year-old she-goat, a three-year-old ram, a turtledove, and a young bird.”" The Jewish commentator Rashi explains the significance of each sacrifice ...


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