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It is a commonly held belief that The Labyrinth is in fact the Palace of Knossos The Labyrinth has been described as : ... a maze-like building of winding corridors and complicated twists and turns, which confused anyone who entered it so much that he could not find the way out. Which could be considered an apt description of the palace. The Palace of ...


14

The settlement of Knossos is associated with the palace of king Minos who housed the Minotaur, as Wikipedia tells us. There are, however, as far as I know, no actual remains discovered of the labyrinth itself. A common interpretation is that the Laybyrinth is actually the palace. However, Wikipedia also shows us a coin that supposedly is from Knossos, ...


12

I can't find any version of the myth that directly addresses this question, but the description of the labyrinth in Ovid's Metamorphoses leads me to suggest at least two educated guesses. 1) It's meant to prevent anyone from ever seeing the Minotaur, because Minos is that ashamed of it. Mean-while the monster of a human-beast, His family's reproach, ...


9

Plutarch quotes Philochorus in Life of Theseus and tells us that (although the Cretans wouldn't admit it) the labyrinth was a normal prison: But Philochorus writeth, that the Cretans do not confess that, but say that this labyrinth was a gail or prison, in the which they had no other hurt, saving that they which were kept there under lock and key could not ...


8

It was built specifically as a prison for the minotaur. See this article The most famous labyrinth is found in Greek mythology: Designed by Daedalus for King Minos of Knossos to contain the ferocious Minotaur (a half-man and half-bull monster). I'd elaborate further but there's not much more to say that could add value to the answer.


7

It was built specifically to keep the Minotaur in. If you are familiar with the story of the Minotaur, it was the son of Pasiphae, who was the king of Crete's (King Minos) wife. Minos wanted a sign from the gods that he was meant to rule, so Poseidon sent a great bull out of the sea, and told Minos to sacrifice it to him. Minos liked the bull so much that ...


6

The Minotaur was certainly the son of the Queen of Knossos, and possibly the grandson of Poseidon, the patron of Crete. You cannot just sling such a being in a cell; building a separate wing of the palace for him (specially designed for him by the leading architect Daedalus and visited at regular intervals by the best and brightest young people of Greece) ...


4

The oldest written accounts are ambiguous on this point, so it is somewhat difficult to ascertain whether these two are not, in fact, merely aspects of the same tradition rather than two completely distinct, contradictory ones. Hesiod, in his Theogony (c. 700 BC), simply says that Dionysus married Ariadne, with no mention at all of Theseus. The one source ...


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