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25

Loki is an anomaly, his parents were a giant, Fárbauti, and a goddess (or possibly a giantess, we don't know for sure) Laufey. (I can't find any decent images of either Fárbauti or Laufey) Loki was originally considered a fire deity, before becoming the trickster we know him as. Farbauti means 'fierce strike' and Laufey means 'pine needles'. So his birth was ...


14

I have slightly modified the following from a Yahoo! Answers question I answered sometime ago. He is referred to as a god in the Nibelungenlied and the Völsungasaga. In the Eddas he is generally referred to as an Ás, i.e., one of the gods called the Æsir. An example of this is in the Gylfaginning, from the Prose Edda, in which appears also the most ...


11

Both the Dutch and the English wikipedia pages state that Loki is the son of Fárbauti and Laufey, who are both giants (Jötun). Loki is a Jötun, a giant, as well. The Dutch page adds that he is also a blood brother to Odin. This comes from the Edda Odin! dost thou remember when we in early days blended our blood together? The fact that Loki can ...


10

Loki is the son of a giant (Farbauti) according to both Snorri and the 9th century poem Haustlong. Snorri tells us that Farbauti is a giant, but doesn't say what species (?) Laufey is. The fact that Loki's mother is mainly known as Laufey, which probably means "leafy island", has led to speculation that she was a goddess, or at least not a giant. (...


9

Because there are many possibilities. Lewk, as you mentioned, but also: leugh - To tell a lie leug - To break lok/loka/luka - Either a lid, a container, or To close; this could be a reference to his role in Ragnarok (killing Heimdall) Without anything definitive, we're forced to either pick a preference, or admit that there are many possibilities. After ...


9

According to an annotation by translator Henry Adams Bellows, There exists no account of any incident in which Othin and Loki thus swore blood-brotherhood, but they were so often allied in enterprises that the idea is wholly reasonable. The common process of "mingling blood" was carried out quite literally, and the promise of -which Loki speaks is ...


9

The verses you're quoting come from an extremely cryptic poem called the Shorter Voluspa, which is inserted into the longer poem Hyndluljod, and has little to do with it. Like the Volupsa itself, you really need to know the stories already to get the references, as they don't give any details. No other source says anything about this, so that one reference ...


7

Just because two words look similar does not mean they are related. Coincidental resemblances are very common between unrelated words. Etymology as a science is based on the comparative method where established patterns of correspondences between different languages are considered the main evidence for a particular word's origin. Corresponding words often ...


7

The why is largely a mystery, and depends a fair bit on exactly what you perceive Loki's general function to be (Jens Peter Schjødt seems to have considered Loki a sort of personification of fate, growing more and more adverse to the gods as their time progresses), but perhaps we can say something about the second part of the question. First, we should ...


7

The Prose Edda is unclear on this. All it tells us is that when Loki saw that Baldr could not be harmed,"he was not pleased". (Gylfaginning 49) In my own opinion, the way that Loki's three children by Angrboda: Hel, the World Serpent and the Fenris wolf were bound or cast out might have something to do with it. (Gylf. 34-5) They may be monsters, but to Loki ...


7

Murder was very much a capital crime: Icelandic sagas are typically all about grand vendettas were there is one death upon another. However, there were honorable and not honorable killings, different rules for settling feuds by paying reparations, etc, which makes it a complicated mess. The main rule was, however, that if you killed someone, that person's ...


7

In a way, you could say that Loki was bound to fufill a prophecy. As the cosmological poem Voluspa tells us, when Loki frees himself from his bonds, the doom of the gods will begin. So Loki has to be bound so he can get free and lead the giants against the gods. One of the most convincing explanations I've ever seen for Loki's behaviour in Lokasenna is ...


6

The available sources on Norse mythology do not seem to give much importance to (for a lack of a better term) "biological relations". Instead, they place a lot of emphasis on the "function" of characters. Hence, Loki is never referred to as a Jötunn, despite being the son of the giant Farbauti (the category of beings to which his mother ...


5

Since solsdottir has answered the part about the parentage of the monsters, I'll try to answer the part of why Loki would eat the heart: The motif of eating the cooked heart of a monster also appears in the story of Sigurd, who eats the heart of the dragon Fafnir and gains knowledge. That story suggests that his fosterfather Regin expected at least ...


5

You are thinking about a story referenced in the Húsdrápa, which Snorri excerpted in his Edda. It plays out more or less as you described, except Heimdall does not catch Loki in the act, but is asked by Freya to retrieve Brisingamen. The only detail to add was that evidently Heimdall and Loki fought as seals. That is really all we know about it. Further ...


4

I don't think it was as much Loki doing anything to Heimdallr in particular as much as it was the fact Loki betrayed all the Aesir when he orchestrating Baldur's death. It is this reason that Loki was imprisoned to begin with. It is prophesied that, come Ragnarok, Loki will escape from his bonds and join forces with the Giants against the Gods. After that, ...


4

There is their visit to Regin in Reginsmál; this is part of the background for the story of Sigurd, known from the story fo the Völsungs. Odin, Loki and Hœnir are on a journey. Loki kills what he thinks is an otter eating a salmon; the other two approve and they make abag of the skin. Later, they visit Hreidmar, who was the father of Otr, who had taken the ...


4

The thing about this fragment is that half of it is dual-layered, and the rest is poetic. How it is being read above (that he ate an actual heart, got physically pregnant, etc.) is utterly at odds with poetic license, metaphor, and the skaldic love of wordplay and kennings- and thus missing what IMO are the most likely interpretations of the verse. To ...


4

Yes. Heimdall and Loki slay one another. From the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturlson in the Gylfaginning Ch 16, emphasis mine: The Wolf shall swallow Odin; that shall be his ending But straight thereafter shall Vídarr stride forth and set one foot upon the lower jaw of the Wolf: on that foot he has the shoe, materials for which have been gathering ...


3

This is something very usual to happen in old stories, specially in the mythological ones. They have a dream-like logic and a dream-like inconsistency. The latter is clear, for example, when talking about sizes, Fenrir may be a normal sized wolf when tied down by the æsir, but he is sometimes described as having a jaw that can touch the sky when open and so ...


3

Loki isn't necessarily going without Iðunn's apples. Although it is not specified anywhere, it seems reasonable to assume that his wife Sigyn is feeding him. The Gylfaginning states that Loki's torment in the cave is lessened because: Sigyn, his wife, stands near him and holds a basin under the venom-drops; and when the basin is full, she goes and pours ...


2

In the Poetic Edda, it's clear that Loki is different from the Aesir. He descended from Ymir, whereas the Aesir did not. It's possible that his rules are different from the Aesir's, too. For example, he shape shifted into the female gender on several different occasions; whereas, the Aesir were never known to do that. It seemed likely that he went for ...


2

According to Snorri's texts, yes, but it is the only source of such a story. He says: "Loki á orrostu við Heimdall, ok verðr hvárr annars bani." My own translation: "Loki goes to battle against Heimdallr, and both cause death to each other." We don't know how much we can trust on Snorri's texts, since they were written long after the old norse ...


1

I would say he is by biology half Jotunn half Aesir. The only reasonable reason he would be called as a son of Laufey and not of Farboti is that she was a goddess most likely exiled as a result of her marrying Fatboti. This makes Loki an outsider to both Aesir and Jotunn and explains his nature. He needed his fickle nature to survive as both groups wanted ...


1

In the first chapter of “Demonology and Devil-lore”, Moncure Conway proposes that Loki's reminder to Odin in the Lokasenna suggests the two gods may have originated from the same primitive concept; that they once were the good and evil side of the same coin: The intermediate processes by which the good and evil were detached, and advanced to separate ...


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