11

The dragons trapped by Lludd. In The Adventure of Lludd and Llefelys, there are three plagues which fall upon Britain. The second is a horrible screech that renders the inhabitants scared. King Lludd, on the advice of his brother, Llefelys, builds a pit in the center of Britain, at Oxford. He traps the dragons responsible for the screeches by getting them ...


6

The head was placed facing France to protect Britain from Saxon invasion. Ireland, was no longer a concern (emphasis mine): 'Shame on my beard,' said he 'if I don't open the door and find out whether it is true what is said about it. [So] he opened the door, and looked out to Cornwall and over Aber Henvelen. And when he looked, suddenly everything they had ...


6

Does this story appear in Roman folklore? No. Firstly, we should verify that the Magnus Maximus in the story is, in fact, the same Magnus Maximus as we see in recorded history. This excerpt is from De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, a historical document from the 6th century AD (emphasis mine): The tyranni. At length also, as thickets of tyrants were ...


2

Onomastic tales like this one are common in literature and histories, be it the Middle Ages or Ancient Greece (there are several others in The Mabinogion, as well). Such place-name explanations can involve real or fictitious locales, and often provide rather fanciful rationalizations. In this particular instance, the author (or, perhaps originally, poet) ...


1

It is interesting to note that these rivers, as well as other sunken places, are mentioned in Patrick Sims-Williams's Irish Influence on Medieval Welsh Literature, p192ff. (Findable at Google Books.) The chapter mentions other places that seem to have been known dry land locations that had flooded within historical or literary memory (one got uncovered ...


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