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Old Norse For Old Norse, heimskringla.no has a lot of material, including different editions (also in modern Nordic languages). The site itself is mostly in Norwegian, so it can be tricky to navigate if you don't speak a Nordic language. There are two obvious books to start with: Snorri's Edda. This is usually the preferable starting point, as it is a ...


8

Gothic As mentioned in andejons’ answer, there is not a lot of material in the Gothic language. Apart from Wulfila's Bible translation on the Wulfila project (where you can also find a calendar fragment, the Gothic signatures of the Naples and Arezzo deeds and the Skeireins fragment, a part of a commentary on the gospel of John), there is another website, ...


7

Old Irish Mary Jones' Celtic Literature Collective This is the best place to find Irish and Wesh language mythology with the original sources. It's actually an amateur project, but I've seen it referenced and students directed there on university courses. CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts A good but limited source of Irish texts of all ages, because it (and ...


6

witchcraft Red hair was a sign of witchcraft in Christian Europe and it was said that it was often seen as a marker of guilt in the eyes of witch finders. There are many examples of redheads being stereotyped as untrustworthy in medieval times. The "Proverbs of Alfred" warn not to choose a red-haired person as a friend and the "Secretum ...


6

The Perseus Project is an exceptional resource for Greek and Latin Texts (not complete, but quite comprehensive): Perseus Collection; Greek and Roman Materials It's particularly useful because you can read most of the texts in either English or the original, and the ancient Greek and Latin words are all hypertext links to lexical entries. They also have ...


4

According to E.V. Walter's article "Nature on Trial: The Case of the Rooster That Laid an Egg", such medieval animal trials where very similar in spirit to witch trials: the guilty animals were often believed to be possessed by evil spirits, demons, or the Devil himself. In "Legal Lore: Curiosities of Law and Lawyers", William Andrews ...


3

It would seem that in the pre-Abrahamic cultures of Europe and Arabia, Jinn and Daemons are broadly similar in that they are both spirits higher than humans and worthy of worship but not necessarily Gods (bare in mind sources for this period might be limited) see Greek Religion (1995), and Islam, Arabs, and Intelligent World of the Jinn (2009). The key ...


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