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21

The source of the story is the Þrymskviða poem (The Lay of Thrym), which is included in the Poetic Edda. It was Thrymr, king of the jötnar, who stole Mjölnir. He then demanded the gods allow him to marry Freyja, in order to return it. Thor travelled to Jötunheimr to claim back his hammer, and he managed to sneak in dressed as a bride. Loki wasn't ...


19

Yes, it seems so. In the Prose Edda, when Thor is presented with the hammer by Brokkr, this property is in the description (Page 147, here): Then he gave the hammer to Thor, and said that Thor might smite as hard as he desired, whatsoever might be before him, and the hammer would not fail; and if he threw it at anything, it would never miss, and never ...


18

As said already, your story is taken from Þrymskviða. There's a retelling of the story named The Children of Odin, which refers to that in a more easily comprehensible way: The actual story does not say that Loki stole the hammer from Thor. Then when they were far from Jötunheim Thor missed Miölnir, missed the hammer that was the defence of Asgard and ...


9

The 11th century Christian missionary Adam of Bremen wrote, "Thor, they say, presides over the air, he governs the thunder and lightning. the winds and rains." The Norse believed that during a thunderstorm, Thor rode through the heavens on his chariot pulled forward by the goats Tanngrisnir ("gap-tooth") and Tanngnjóstr ("tooth grinder"). Lightning ...


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