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Complicated Well, it definitely doesn't claim to be folklore at all, it was just in a book by Thomas Nast. (Linked full size image is over 7 MiB; Wikimedia Commons page; image is in the public domain) Santaclausville, N[orth] P[ole] Another example related to Nast is by George P. Webster: "His home through the long summer months, you must know, Is ...


5

It relates to Spiritualism and modern extensions. Essentially, spiritualism uses "magic tricks" (illusions) to create the impression of paranormal activity, often as simple as thumping a table or flickering candles. These techniques have been extended to electrical interference per a recent trend called EVP (electronic voice phenomenon). As Rodia ...


5

Obviously, this is a modern trope, not true folklore, as electrification process took from around the 1880s to the 1960s. I suspect this idea of ghosts affecting electricity originated in the movie Poltergeist (1982), but in the TV Tropes site, under their entry: Electromagnetic Ghosts, the older example I could find was Richard Matheson's Hell House, a ...


3

The following I found on Wikipedia: Asked about how the Merkel-Raute was introduced as her trademark, Merkel stated that "there was always the question, what to do with your arms, and that's how it came about." She chose the gesture without having been assisted by a counsellor because "it contains a certain symmetry." and later on When used by her own ...


3

Santa Claus is derived from the Dutch festival figure St Nicholas, or Sinterklaas. The story is that St Nicholas is a Roman Catholic bishop who rides over the rooftop on a white horse at night, accompanied by his black manservant. While the children are asleep they bring presents, throwing them through the chimney, or the manservant climbing down the ...


2

One of the original holidays that was merged together to create the modern Christmas is Yule (in Scandinavian languages, Christmas is still called "jul" or "jól"); this was apparently celebrated around midwinter; the term to "drink yule" appears in the poem Hrafnsm%C3%A1l dated to the 10th century, but it is unclear exactly what the celebrations would have ...


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