6

In 1828 the Danish sculptor Albert Bertel Thorvaldsen made this piece (above), entitled Cupid Leading Cerberus. On his website the Greek Mythology Link, Carlos Parada has labelled this picture: "Cupid in the Underworld, as the Tamer of Cerberus, with Pluto’s Pitchfork". This artwork of Thorvaldsen does not seem to be based on any ancient myth but it does ...


6

The first description of the manticore with have is from Ctesias, let's read him (Translation from John Freese freely available): The martikhora is an animal found in this country. It has a face like a man's, a skin red as cinnabar, and is as large as a lion. It has three rows of teeth, ears and light-blue eyes like those of a man; its tail is like ...


5

Theoi to save the day! The two earliest Greek works both attest to its general composition: Homer, Iliad 6. 179 ff (trans. Lattimore) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) : "First he [King Iobates of Lykia (Lycia)] sent him [Bellerophon] away with orders to kill the Khimaira (Chimera) none might approach; a thing of immortal make, not human, lion-fronted and snake ...


5

An early theme in several mythologies, particularly on the land masses referred to, in English, as Europe, Asia and North America, is that of women giving birth to giants, usually humanoid ones. In the chronology of the myths themselves, these women often live in the time prior to the Flood which covered the entire earth at some point thousands of years ago (...


5

I can't find anything on Demeter at present. Wikipedia seems to be drawing from the Metamorphoses of Antoninus Liberalis, which has no mention of additional divine transformations: Apollo became a hawk, Hermes and ibis, Ares became a fish, the lepidotus, Artemis a cat, Dionysus took the shape of a goat, Heracles a fawn, Hephaestus an ox, and Leto a shrew ...


4

I'd suggest doing some reading on Buddhist "demons", the daughters of Mara in particular. Wiki lists the three daughters as: Taṇhā ("thirst, desire, longing, greed") Arati ("aversion, discontentment") Raga (""greed, sensuality, lust, desire") The wiki also mentions two other daughters, associated with Pride and Fear. There is definitely the idea that ...


4

In Hesiod's Theogony Cerberus was the offspring of Echidna and Typhon (on the other hand, Hesiod did call him fifty-headed, so). To back this story up, note that Euphorion of Chalcis described him as having eyes that flashed like the volcanic Mount Etna. Why would this back anything up? Because traditionally, Typhon either resided in Tartarus or was buried ...


3

The only ancient text which mentions the parents of the Stymphalian birds makes it sound like these killer avians were Arkadian [Arcadian] princesses. A scholion on Apollonius Rhodius' Argonautika 2.1054 preserves a statement made by the writer Mnaseas of Patrae. As with other things that Mnaseas has to say, it isn't quite the interpretation you might ...


3

Couple of different things. The ancient Greek scholia on Homer's Odyssey give several different accounts of the origin of Kharybdis. In one she was a daughter of Pontos (Sea) and Gaia (Earth) who laid siege to the land with her waves. Zeus, in anger, captured and chained her to the sea-bed. In another tale, she was a voracious women who stole the cattle ...


3

There is a category on Wikipedia dedicated to this subject, and Mental Floss has a list of 11 rather interesting creatures of African mythology: Grootslang Grootslang is an Afrikaans word meaning "great snake." The monster of that name lives in a cave called the Wonder Hole in the Richtersveld area of South Africa. The story is that the ...


3

From the birth myth of Arion, we are told (Pseudo-Apollodorus) that the horse was birthed by Demeter while she was in 'the likeness of a Fury'. We are also told that Despoina is the daughter of Demeter and Horse-Poseidon. Karl Kerenyi noted that she could take on the form of either an ear of grain, or a mare. So it seems that your guess is right.


2

The writing, entitled the Bibliotheca, "Library," used to be attributed to the Athenian historian Apollodorus, but, as Wikipedia says, 'that attribution is now regarded as false, and so "Pseudo-" was added to Apollodorus' so that one now reads about 'Pseudo-Apollodorus' (pseudo meaning 'false') penning that work, whose actual author is apparently unknown. ...


2

Almost all of the monsters of Greek myth are clearly said to have been children of deities or at least were quite closely related to the gods, whether the divinities in view were Titanic, primaeval or otherwise. Good Old Regular Wildlife There is also an assortment of monstrous beasts, quite popular especially in later mythography, which appear to have ...


2

The family unit was like a religion to people in the olden days and the importance of family honour more keenly felt, even to the extent that anything (bad) that happened in the family might have to stay in the family for fear of causing a stink among friends' families and the wider society, which was, compared with now, a comparatively small community. ...


2

Perhaps a bit tenuous, but The Worm That Walks might be the closest to what you're seeking. I am not aware of a similar equivalent term from classical mythology, but you could argue this to be inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos. One interpretation of the ending to HP Lovecraft's The Festival is a monster composed of maggots: Wisely did Ibn Schacabac say, ...


1

Look at the Greek goddess Okays, she is the goddess of misery, grief and regret. Otherwise The Algea were the personifications of sorrow in Greek mythology, daughters of the goddess of strife, Eris. In African lore we have the Tikoloshe or bogeyman as most western cultures adopt it.


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