9 votes

Why did the Romans name the planets after their gods?

The Romans were not the first and only to apply this practice. The seven classical planets (visible to the naked eye, 5 of which today are considered actual planets) were named after deities in ...
Codosaur's user avatar
  • 5,368
7 votes

Is Phoebus an alternate name for Apollo or is a description of Apollo?

It is used in both these ways. Among the Ancient Greeks and Romans, just as in almost any other culture or language in the world, especially in the neighbourhood of the Mediterranean Basin, if a ...
Adinkra's user avatar
  • 9,833
6 votes

How many Ancient Greek names got their English names from French or nativised in English?

There are dozens of Greek first names still in use today.. Many of them don't sound so strange to us because we're familiar with them. It's usually only the names that are not commonly given to people ...
Codosaur's user avatar
  • 5,368
5 votes

Which cultures have the concept of a "true" or "secret name?"

In Egyptian mythology Isis created a serpent to poison Ra and only gave him the antidote when he revealed his true name to her. Isis passed this name on to Horus, strengthening his royal authority. ...
Tom Sol's user avatar
  • 4,061
5 votes
Accepted

Hoenir in Tolkien's writing

Not really. First, we should really note that "fate" is very strongly associated with female, collective deities in Norse mythology: the Norns, the Valkyries and the Dísir all are connected ...
andejons's user avatar
  • 6,006
4 votes

What is the origin of the akhlut's name?

Found two Yupik dictionaries but neither had 'akhlut'. Then found the article below: http://offbeat.wikia.com/wiki/Akhlut Akhlut Other Names Kăk-whăn'-û-ghăt Kǐg-û-lu'-nǐk Origin ...
tblue's user avatar
  • 709
3 votes

Besides Apollo, no main Roman god shared the name of its Greek version -- why?

Before the Romans conquered the Greeks, they already had their own pantheon of gods. As they assimilated the Greek religion into their own, they found similarities between their gods and the Greek ...
Mitch Freitas's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Name for the "soul-mates" in Plato's "The Symposium"?

Unfortunately, Aristophanes doesn't give any particular name for these pairs: he just calls them "people" or "humans" (ἀνθρώποι). He calls the half-man-half-woman one "...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 1,288
3 votes

Why did the Romans name the planets after their gods?

It is an interesting question as there are two sides to it: (1) history (2) language. For the Mediterranean world the planets became really interesting with the spread of astrology during the ...
sand1's user avatar
  • 836
3 votes

Is there a god called Iob/Job/Yov?

A friend of mine wrote to me that this is probably a reference to "Jove" which is another name for the Roman god Jupiter.
Reb Chaim HaQoton's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What were the original names of Mochdref, Mochtref, Mochnant and Mochtref?

Onomastic tales like this one are common in literature and histories, be it the Middle Ages or Ancient Greece (there are several others in The Mabinogion, as well). Such place-name explanations can ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 464
3 votes

Is there a deeper meaning to Utgard-Loki, Loki, and Logi?

Logi means, as pointed out above, fire, so that is explained. Loki and Uthgarda Loki are, however, more open to debate. There is a theory these days that when Snorri Sturlusson wrote the mythology ...
Sigve Moen's user avatar
3 votes

Why was one of the Hecatoncheires known by a different name by men and the gods?

Son of Aigaios? As far as English translations of the Iliad go, there is a rather unique interpretation of the word Αἰγαίων᾽ in Richmond Alexander Lattimore's 1951 translation of the Iliad (...
Adinkra's user avatar
  • 9,833
2 votes
Accepted

What Ionia does Solinus say is named after Ione, daughter of Aulochus?

In 1629, Claude de Saumaise, who also styled himself by a Latinised form of his name, as Claudius Salmasius, wrote a commentary on Solinus's Polyhistor text to which you are referring. He was just as ...
Adinkra's user avatar
  • 9,833
2 votes

Is Phoebus an alternate name for Apollo or is a description of Apollo?

I was taught that there is a relationship between φοῖβος (brightness) and φόβος (fear). The idea is that Apollo's radiance is not gentle, but glaring like the sun. Apollo is not typically ...
DukeZhou's user avatar
  • 14.1k
2 votes

Is there a god called Iob/Job/Yov?

According to Wikipedia, there was an Egyptian deity named Iabet, sometimes also known as Iab. If this is what Rabbi Ashenburg is referring to, then perhaps the story was that prior to arriving in ...
Harel13's user avatar
  • 942
2 votes

Why did the Romans name the planets after their gods?

Why did the Romans name the planets after their gods? According to Roman mythology, the Roman gods lived on Mount Olympos, in Greece. Mount Olympus is the highest mountain in Greece. It is located ...
Ken Graham's user avatar
  • 2,852
2 votes
Accepted

A monster made of many insects

Perhaps a bit tenuous, but The Worm That Walks might be the closest to what you're seeking. I am not aware of a similar equivalent term from classical mythology, but you could argue this to be ...
Semaphore's user avatar
  • 7,836
2 votes

Is there any evidence of a Jewish demon named Khoyzek?

Sadan's article is discussed in depth here. Yiddish is a thousand-year-old Jewish language, with origins, according to a broad scholarly consensus, in the German Rhineland. The major component of ...
Codosaur's user avatar
  • 5,368
2 votes
Accepted

Greek female name associated with gifts, a tool, a weapon, or a lie - must sound relatively 'normal' for a modern name

Basically you'd have to modernize an existing name to your purpose. *(F) = Female *(M) = Male Hesiod, Theogony 211ff (trans. Evelyn White; Greek epic 8th or 7th century B.C.):[3] And Nyx (F)(Night) ...
13Leezah's user avatar
1 vote

Greek female name associated with gifts, a tool, a weapon, or a lie - must sound relatively 'normal' for a modern name

Best two-edged name I can think of is IEZABEL (Ἰεζάβελ): Greek form of Hebrew Iyzebel ("Ba'al exalts," "unchaste," or "without cohabitation"), but meaning "chaste, intact.". Modern-day form would be ...
Codosaur's user avatar
  • 5,368

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