Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

15

Since this is more a philological question, I'm going with this somewhat different take on the matter from noted philologist J.R.R. Tolkien: Fairy, as a noun more or less equivalent to elf, is a relatively modern word, hardly used until the Tudor period. The first quotation in the Oxford Dictionary (the only one before A.D. 1450) is significant. It is ...


13

The Old English word for fairies is elf (Online Etymology Dictionary): “one of a race of powerful supernatural beings in Germanic folklore,” Old English elf (Mercian, Kentish), ælf (Northumbrian), ylfe (plural, West Saxon) “sprite, fairy, goblin, incubus,” from Proto-Germanic *albiz (cognates: Old Saxon alf, Old Norse alfr, German alp “evil spirit, goblin,...


10

The only thing in common is the spelling. LOK in Norse means - The end, or to lock the end. So Loki would be who everyone goes to when they die. UTGARD in Norse, from the wiki means - Outyards or outlands Utgard-Loki is the ruler of the Outyards (Utgard) and his name is also Loki so the name means, Loki ruler of Utgard. Logi in Norse literally means ...


7

It is used in both these ways. Among the Ancient Greeks and Romans, just as in almost any other culture or language in the world, especially in the neighbourhood of the Mediterranean Basin, if a descriptive title or nickname gets enough usage, not surprisingly, it coagulates into something that, for all intents and purposes, is "a proper name." William ...


6

There are dozens of Greek first names still in use today.. Many of them don't sound so strange to us because we're familiar with them. It's usually only the names that are not commonly given to people nowadays or the ones that stem from Greek literature or mythology that make us wonder. At the root of the difference in nomenclature in modern Anglo-Saxon ...


5

Not really. First, we should really note that "fate" is very strongly associated with female, collective deities in Norse mythology: the Norns, the Valkyries and the Dísir all are connected with fate somehow. On the other hand, we don't really know much of what kind of god Hoenir was. He does appear as a companion of Odin when the first humans where ...


4

Found two Yupik dictionaries but neither had 'akhlut'. Then found the article below: http://offbeat.wikia.com/wiki/Akhlut Akhlut Other Names Kăk-whăn'-û-ghăt Kǐg-û-lu'-nǐk Origin Yupik Location Ice floes around the Bering Sea Disposition Malevolent Akhlut are shapeshifting spirits from Yupik myth. They appear as either ...


3

Logi means, as pointed out above, fire, so that is explained. Loki and Uthgarda Loki are, however, more open to debate. There is a theory these days that when Snorri Sturlusson wrote the mythology down he, due to his own Christian beliefs needed a Satan-figure and that role was given to Loki. This explains why he went from being on the side of the Aesir to ...


3

Son of Aigaios? As far as English translations of the Iliad go, there is a rather unique interpretation of the word Αἰγαίων᾽ in Richmond Alexander Lattimore's 1951 translation of the Iliad (specifically Book 1, Line 404 in this case). A straight transliteration thereof would give us "Aigaion". English translations tend to then Latinise this into "Aegaeon" (...


2

Perhaps a bit tenuous, but The Worm That Walks might be the closest to what you're seeking. I am not aware of a similar equivalent term from classical mythology, but you could argue this to be inspired by the Cthulhu Mythos. One interpretation of the ending to HP Lovecraft's The Festival is a monster composed of maggots: Wisely did Ibn Schacabac say, ...


2

I was taught that there is a relationship between φοῖβος (brightness) and φόβος (fear). The idea is that Apollo's radiance is not gentle, but glaring like the sun. Apollo is not typically portrayed a "warm, fuzzy" character, but as uncompromising, like truth, for which he is a patron. His brightness is fearsome, deadly, and unerring, like his arrows. ...


1

A friend of mine wrote to me that this is probably a reference to "Jove" which is another name for the Roman god Jupiter.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible