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10

According to the tale of Erysichthon of Thessaly and his daughter Mestra - as relayed by Ovid - dryads do not survive the destruction of their tree: But Erysichthon, heedless of all things, ordered his slaves to fell the sacred oak, and as they hesitated, in a rage the wretch snatched from the hand of one an axe, and said, “If this should be the ...


4

Different mythologies being consolidated, mainly. Originally—by which I mean as far back as we have evidence to speculate—Poseidon seems to have been married to the earth-deity Dā. The oldest attested form of his name is Maecenean po-te-da-on, presumably from potei Dāōn, "husband of Dā"; this would make him the son-in-law of Demeter (Dā-mātēr, "Dā's mother")...


4

Nymphs are associated with nature, and nature is expansive. This Source has a list near the bottom of Nymphs, their names, and their classification by dwelling. Classification tends to overlap and it's not always clear. Obviously with any Mythology there are uncertainties, Nymphs fortunately are one of the easier of the uncertainties. Because they are ...


4

I've done some preliminary research, and found nothing on Thaleia. This is one of those wonderful little "mythical myths" where the only sources are secondary: all we know of this nymph comes from a mention in ancient text "The Life of Aeschylus" with no author attributed. The mention is apparently in relation to a lost play of Aeschylus. So that's all ...


2

One More Wife To complicate the issue yet a little bit further, if we take Plato's dialogue Kritias into account, Poseidon actually has three wives, not just two. According to the description of the foundation of Atlantis in Kritias, Poseidon was married to a certain Kleïto [Cleïto] who bore him five sets of twin sons who ruled the land, which was named ...


2

Homer, Iliad 20. 4 ff ff (trans. Lattimore) (Greek epic C8th B.C.) : "But Zeus, from the many-folded peak of Olympos, told Themis to summon all the gods into assembly. She went everywhere, and told them to make thier way to Zeus' house. There was no River [Potamoi] that was not there, except only Okeanos (Oceanus), there was not one of the Nymphai (Nymphs) ...


2

We don't really know... although I have a theory. Several ancient sources mention this nymph Thaleia (or Thalia) but only one, Stephanus of Byzantium, s.v. Palikê, says anything about her parentage. One of the dozens of the lost works of the playwright Aeschylus is mentioned by other authors using so many different versions of its title that there is a ...


1

Hylas was beloved by Hercules, which is likely reason enough for Hera to have him kidnapped. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Hylas


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