39

The number 12 is used in most religions as something holy and perfect. In every religion you can see that the number twelve is always present in main events or facts: e.g. Greek Mythology: Labours of Hercules, the Dodecatheon and twelve Titans, according to Hesiod. Christianity: The 12 Disciples of Christ Norse Mythology: Odin had 12 sons Islam: There are ...


36

A 'god' is synonymous to a 'deity'; the Titans and Titanesses were gods, they were members of the second order of divine beings - after Gaia and Uranus, and the other primordial deities. Cronus and his fellow Titans comprised the second Ancient Greek pantheon (the first comprising of deities such as Ananke, Gaea, and Ouranos), which the younger generation of ...


25

The Greek Gods have their own hierarchy/timeline going on. First were the primordial deities, the first beings in existence, which included Uranus and Gaia. Then, descended from the primordial deities were the Titans, which included Chronos and Rhea (Zeus' parents). Note that the Titans were still deities. According to Wikipedia: Among the first ...


21

Plato suggests a connection between the monthly feasts, the Greek tribes and the gods: For the law will state that there are twelve feasts to the twelve gods who give their names to the several tribes: to each of these they shall perform monthly sacrifices and assign choirs and musical contests, and also gymnastic contests, as is suitable both to the gods ...


17

There is some disagreement on this issue. According to Theogony, lines 881-885 (emphasis mine): But when the blessed gods completed their toil and made settlement of honors for the Titans by brute force, they urged wide-seeing Olympian Zeus in accord with the advice of Gaia to be king and lord, and he apportioned provinces to them well. However, in the ...


15

According to Pseudo-Apollodorus, the three brothers drew lots to decide their dominions: But when Zeus was full-grown, he took Metis, daughter of Ocean, to help him, and she gave Cronus a drug to swallow, which forced him to disgorge first the stone and then the children whom he had swallowed, and with their aid Zeus waged the war against Cronus and the ...


14

I agree that there isn't evidence that Artemis was exclusively a lesbian, and no myth as far as I know that explicitly states that either, but there is was such an implication. In the Callisto myth, Zeus takes on the form of Artemis in order to have sex with Callisto, one of her followers. He does this to "lure her into his embrace". So even though she ...


12

The word "Titan" is used to denote a class of mythological entities that existed before "Gods" were born and Titans are usually used to describe the creation of the world. All titans were born from Uranus (Sky) and Gaia (Earth), which were the first mythological creatures to be created when the world was formed. After them, Cronus was born, the cunning, ...


12

Artemis doesn't seek the company of man, that is true. She is the virgin goddess of the hunt, and she usually is escorted by young virgins. Virginity is linked to purity, and Artemis is one of the symbols of this. She fell in love only one time with Orion. But he was killed by Gaïa because he threatened to kill every beast on the earth in his mad hunt ...


11

Cadmus may have been the first mortal (Harmonia was immortal) to be married while Olympians watched, but he was not the only one. Peleus and Thetis were married on Mount Pelion. Thetis was, according to some stories, immortal, but Peleus himself was mortal. While on mount Pelion, Peleus married the Nereid Thetis, by whom he became the father of Achilles, ...


10

Argolis, E. Peloponnesos TROIZENOS Poseidon vs Athena > 1 - 1 In the scramble for patronage over city territories, there's an occasion on which Zeus declared a draw between Poseidon and Athena when these two competed for Troizenos [Troezen]. According to Pausanias' Description of Greece, by Leïs, the first princess of the city, Poseidon became the father of ...


10

In later (hellenistic) times Zeus tended to monopolize all powers and earthquakes came to be his deed. There is a classic book by AB Cook Zeus: a study in ancient religion, part3 has some 30 pages on "Zeus and eartquakes", eg. p.21: The same feeling that the failure of the solid ground can be ascribed to no power lower than the highest prompts the ...


9

Hephaestus’ ugly appearance and lameness is taken by some to represent peripheral neuropathy and skin cancer resulting from arsenicosis caused by arsenic exposure from metalworking. Bronze age smiths added arsenic to copper to produce harder arsenical bronze, especially during periods of tin scarcity. Many Bronze Age smiths would have suffered from chronic ...


8

The shift has to do with Hestia originally being one of the twelve; then when Dionysus became a god, she gave up her throne for Dionysus. Interestingly enough, this unbalanced the council; there were then 7 men and 5 women. These were Zeus Hera Ares Athena Apollo Artemis (initially) Hestia (then later) Dionysus Poseidon Aphrodite Demeter Hephaestus Hermes ...


8

I don't think that the number 12 symbolized everything, as there are occurrence of other numbers in various stories. Odysseus sailed for 9 days with the gift of Favorable Winds from Aeolus, god of wind and on the 10th day, the bag was opened as he saw Ithaka for on the horizon. Dimitra searched for her daughter for 9 days and on the tenth day, she discovered ...


7

Based on Zeus' having rescued his siblings from the belly of their father Kronos; and on the deal that he made with the Titans who eventually sided with him (which is the majority of the Titan population, by the way), starting with his personal bodyguard the four winged children of Pallas and Styx, namely Zelos, Kratos, Bia and Nike; and on his leadership in ...


7

In the same chapter "Zeus and the Earthquakes" of Zeus: a study in ancient religion, Vol. III, by Arthur Bernard Cook, quoted by @sand1 in his answer, the author says: In point of fact, the earliest extant description of an earthquake attributes the phenomenon, naively enough, to the action of Zeus, who nods his head, shakes his hair, and thereby ...


6

No. Both Hades and Poseidon, Zeus's brothers, prefer their own domains to Olympus. Hades lives in the underworld and Poseidon in the sea, near Euboea. Hephaestus, another one of the dodekatheon, lived on Lemnos island after Hera ejected him from Olympus. In Thracian mythology, Ares prefered Mount Haimos in Thrace to Olympus. Minor gods could also live ...


6

The thing is, the ancient Greeks and Romans simply didn't have categories for "gay" or "lesbian". In modern times, their idea of sexuality is described as "polymorphic perversity", which translates to "whatever feels good" -- men, women, children, animals, whatever. While data on women is sketchy (their doings were beneath notice for most writers), we do ...


5

Younger, but not by much. Chiron was conceived when Zeus was still a baby, and while Cronus was hunting his youngest son by Rhea. Cronus and Rhea were still living together as husband and wife during Cronus's clandestine union with Philyra. (Some interpretations I have read have it such that it was against Philyra's will.) There was an island in the Black ...


5

Amalthea, the divine goat who fostered Zeus until he grew up and could take revenge on his father Cronos, fed the god on her milk. In some stories this is called ambrosia; in other myths, she made ambrosia from her horns (which is where we get the modern image of the Horn of Plenty, or Cornucopia, used around harvest time). (I can't find any primary sources ...


4

Apollo is initially the god of song, music and poetry, but considered as a solar-god too. Since it is one of the 12 leading god, he took the place of Helios many times. This confusion comes from a nickname, Phoebus, which means "the shiny". The 2 gods had this nickname. But the one who was driving the chariot of the sun, pulled by 4 horses (Pyroïs, Eoos ...


4

The quoted passage informs us that Thetis did not directly intervene against Poseidon, Hera and Athena, who, indeed, yes, should have been more powerful than she. A scholion on Apollonius Rhodius' Argonautica cites Ion of Chios as saying that it was from the sea that Thetis sent Aegaeon "up to protect Zeus". Your quote says that the hundred-handed monster ...


4

I can't answer the part on who makes it, but what it could be, might help with the question. But I'll take a guess it's connected with Dionysus. Salt There is some who believe nectar and ambrosia are referred to interchangeably, with one being the drink the other the food or reversed. Stated here, the word nectar may have come from the Egyptian natron, ...


3

Both Zeus and Athena were deities who were associated with Athens, and important philisophic concepts, while a city needed Hestia's flame at its sacred centre to be complete. Hestia, goddess of the hearth, was more important than you would think from the small part she plays in myths. Every home had a hearth shrine to Hestia, and each city had a public "...


3

the answer is both and depends on time and you can see evidence of that fashion in various other religions (eg. judaism in it's early form described god as a king who sits on his chair while it changed to more abstract entity) speaking specificly on the greeks we know for a fact that offerings were founded near it's peak from wikipedia: But surely they ...


3

Well, it was a temple that just had two separate reasons to be built. Book. Since Poseidon was involved in Athens-Elusis relationship, and Artemis was the Propylaea(1) of Eleusis, so they made one temple to honor both of them. (1) prop·y·lae·um- the entrance to the Acropolis at Athens.


2

A technical one; when he teams up with Hera and Athena and traps Zeus and refuses to let him free. "from Kronos’ son [Zeus] the dark-misted, that time when all the other Olympian gods sought to bind him, Hera and Poseidon and Pallas Athene. But that is three gods, not just Poseidon. So if you don't count that, I would tend to say no.


1

From sources I've read from (I don't remember exactly) it said that Helios first was the sun god but later faded away and then Apollo took the job. I think one reason was because one of his sons didn't drive well on the chariot and died because it destroyed many things.


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