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Dionysus was a mortal that was raised to divinity. While he is most well known for wine and revelry, his portfolio also grew to include: festivals fertility the wilds crops sanity These are centrally important to the daily lives of average citizens for the time. Sure Zeus is the king, and sure Poseidon is incredibly powerful, but I need my crops to grow, ...


6

On the Importance of the Wine-God Dionysos-Bacchus may not have been the most powerful, most important deity of Greece or Rome, nevertheless, for cultures to whom feasts, agriculture and procreation were of no small significance, such as were those of the Greeks and the Romans (and would still be the case today), the god was certainly integral to everyday ...


6

The Protogonos, the Eudemian, the Rhapsodic and the Hieronyman theogonies are all reconstructed, discussed and compared in ML West (1983)'s 'The Orphic Poems'. Unfortunately, I do not have access to this work, so my answer is based solely on reviews, commentaries and criticisms of this book (such as Brisson, 1985 or Betegh, 2004). The main difference seems ...


5

It is commonly accepted that she was born first and assisted with the birth of her brother Apollo. Two quick sources I pulled off of Theoi: "Of the daughters of Koios . . . Leto had relations with Zeus, for which she was hounded by Hera all over the earth. She finally reached Delos and gave birth to Artemis, who thereupon helped her deliver Apollon. ...


4

Simply put, according to the Orphic version of mythology Zeus declared Dionysus the inheritor to the throne. As for the origins of Dionysus, most stories say that he was born in Asia, and one in particular writes that he was born at the town Nysa (from which Dio-Nysus comes), that was later called "Scythopolis", and today is called Beit She'an, located at ...


4

The Homeric Hymn to Delian Apollo mentions a goddess of childbirth, Eileithyia, who was delayed by Hera, forcing Artemis to help her mother birth Apollo. (She was his older sister by a minute or two, so she started in early.) Only Eilithyia, goddess of sore travail, had not heard of Leto's trouble, for she sat on the top of Olympus beneath golden ...


3

It's not Greek, so it's not a complete answer to your question, but there is a parallel in the Sumerian story of Enlil and Ninlil. Ninlil is a gorgeous woman (a dingir exactly, i.e. a Sumerian "god") who loves to bath in the river, but her mother Nunbarshegunu warns her about the god Enlil: The river is Holy woman! [...] don't bath in it! [...] [Enlil] ...


3

In the Orphic tradition, Dionysus was the son of Zeus and Persephone. As a young boy, he was slain by the Titans, at the behest of Hera. Zeus recovered the boy's heart, made it into a potion and gave it to Semele, who then gave birth to the second incarnation of Dionysus. This tradition includes Egyptian elements, having several elements in parallel with the ...


1

In a Word, Yes Yes, in Greek mythology, deities would fairly often assume the forms of other deities. The instances are certainly not as numerous as the stories in which the gods take on the shapes of humans, beasts or other non-divine objects, and they (examples of a certain god appearing as another one, i.e.) almost all occur in Nonnus' Dionysiaka [...


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