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25

We don't know. The only sources for the story are Plato's dialogues Timaeus and Critias, for all we know the story of Atlantis is a completely fictitious product. That said, any of the following historical catastrophes may have been an inspiration for Atlantis: Minoan eruption Thera (partially) sunk as a result of the eruption, which also produced a ...


13

In John Hale's "Lords of the Sea: The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy", he argues that Atlantis was a thinly-veiled allegory for Athens itself and the collapse of their power after over-stretching themselves militarily. It's rather like "Gulliver's Travels" in that the political issues involved are obscured to us, but would have ...


9

Plato describes Atlantis as Three rings of water with two rings of land surrounded the city center. The water rings were connected with canals and a 5-mile canal connected to the ocean. On the land rings were houses, various civic buildings, gardens, and other structures. The diameter of the entire city was only 2-miles. Surrounding the center city was a ...


6

Thrace was a country situated in the actual north part of the Greece, a huge part of Bulgaria and the European part of the Turkey: Source: Wikipedia What we know of Thrace is relatively simple: Thracians were not writing. Herodotus says that: 5-3 & sub: the Thracians are the largest nation in all the world at least after the Indians... The only gods ...


4

Possibly the events in Syracuse were part of Plato's inspiration, cf. Gunnar Rudberg: Atlantis and Syracuse. - Yet possibly Plato talked of Atlantis as a real place, as some academics point out. Academic approaches towardas Plato's Atlantis as a real place can be found here: Atlantis-Scout


3

Unfortunately, Aristophanes doesn't give any particular name for these pairs: he just calls them "people" or "humans" (ἀνθρώποι). He calls the half-man-half-woman one "androgynous" (ἀνδρόγυνος), but that's a common enough word nowadays that it wouldn't be a clear reference. But later, he gives the origin of each gender: ἦν δὲ ...


3

Both Zeus and Athena were deities who were associated with Athens, and important philisophic concepts, while a city needed Hestia's flame at its sacred centre to be complete. Hestia, goddess of the hearth, was more important than you would think from the small part she plays in myths. Every home had a hearth shrine to Hestia, and each city had a public "...


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