15

Most gods die during the battle together with the evil and the two people are left to repopulate the world. The Children of Odin addresses the event in an easily comprehensible way: What said Odin to the Gods and to the Champions who surrounded him? "We will give our lives and let our world be destroyed, but we will battle so that these evil powers ...


13

There haven't been any myths which describe the relationship or stories of interaction between Fenrir and Jörmungandr. This could be because, in Gylfaginning, it is told that Fenrir, Jörmungandr and Hel were just children when they were separated. "evil was to be expected from them, to begin with because of their mother's nature, but still worse because ...


13

Yes. Many different cultures and mythologies depict really similar stories about floods. There are only a handful survivors of the flooding, who have to repopulate the earth. For the Sumerian version of the myth, Enlil sends a flood to kills the too-numerous and too-noisy humans. The god Enki intervenes and warns the king to save his family and a collection ...


12

In Greek mythology there is Deucalion and Pyrrha In Greek mythology, Deucalion (Greek: Δευκαλίων) was the son of Prometheus; ancient sources name his mother as Clymene, Hesione, or Pronoia.1 The anger of Zeus was ignited by the hubris of the Pelasgians, so he decided to put an end to the Bronze Age. Lycaon, the king of Arcadia, had sacrificed a boy to ...


12

The two human survivors are Lif and Lifthrasir. They live through Ragnarök by hiding in Yggdrasil before the great battles, supposedly in Hoddmimir's wood. Apparently, Vafthrudnir told this to Odin in a prophecy. They are mentioned in verse 45 of Vafþrúðnismál: "Líf ok Lifþrasir, en þau leynask munu í holti Hoddmímis; morgindöggvar þau sér at mat ...


10

None, as far as we know. She is not mentioned at all in either the poem Voluspa, which describes the event of Ragnarok, nor in Snorri's version of events in the Prose Edda. All he says is that when Loki arrives at the battle-field of Vigrid, he will have "all Hel's people with him". (Faulkes: 51) After the Ragnarok, "Balder and Hod will arrive from Hel", ...


8

When Ragnarök is described in Völuspá (stanza 34 and on) and Snorri's Edda (Gylfaginning, 55-56), there is very little said about those that are with Hel. The closest we get is that we are told that the ship Naglfar, which somehow is important for Ragnarök, is made from the nails of dead men, but there is no further specification of whom it will carry. ...


7

In the 45th stanza of the Poetic Edda, it is told that Lif and Lifthrasir survived Ragnarok by hiding “in Hoddmimir’s forest” (í holti Hoddmímis) and consuming the morning dew for their food. When the cataclysm passed and the cosmos began to reemerge, the couple went on to repopulate the world. The Poetic Edda. Vafþrúðnismál, stanza 45. The ...


7

If you want to. The three years without summer, the Fimbulwinter, a portent of Ragnarök, has been speculated by some to have been a memory of the years 535-536, when temperatures dropped sharply and crops failed. And while the Ragnarök is indeed the end of the known world, as cybermike noted, the earth will rise again from the sea afterwards, renewed and ...


6

It's most certainly your translation that is a bit free. In the original, the passage you are referring to talks about "gullnar tǫflur", 'golden tables' (stanza 58 in Codex Regius, 54 in Hauksbok; this line is the same in both, despite some other minor variations in the stanza). These are likely the same tables that are mentioned in stanza 8, where the ...


6

The only mention of Dwarves during Ragnarokr I can find is this strange stanza (n°48) from the Völuspá (which can be found as well in the Gylfaginning): What's with the Aesir? What's with the Elf’s? Resound all Jotun-homes; Aesir are at the council, stand the Dwarfs before the stony door, rock-wall wise. Understand ye yet, or what? ...


6

I just spent a little time on the online etymology dictionary: https://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=holt Hoard means a safe place to hide. Mimis' is a god of wisdom and is connected with the world tree and others. a Holt is a coppice, a stand of trees routinely cut to the ground to spring back anew. This keeps the tree living a long time and ensures ...


6

No. Ragnarok isn't just the fall of the Norse pantheon, it's the destruction of the entire world. The stories vary, but something apocalyptic like the whole earth being set on fire or the sky splitting apart normally happens.


5

This is a really good question; it is one which even experts on Norse mythology has trouble finding a good answer for. Gro Steinsland, in Fornnordisk religion, lists three different suggested explanations: A suggestion by Else Munkdal that Níðhöggr is there as a kind of monstrous transport: the corpses he bears are being moved into the new world to be ...


5

Male. Jörmungandr is referred to as a "he" in translations of the Prose Edda, such as (quotes, in both cases, from this text): When they came to him, straightway he cast the serpent [Jörmungandr] into the deep sea, where he lies about all the land; and this serpent grew so greatly that he lies in the midst of the ocean encompassing all the land, and ...


4

Unknown. Our main sources for Ragnarök are the Völuspá, the Vafþrúðnismál, and what Snorri retells of these. The Norns are introduced in verses 19-20 of Völuspá, but that is before Ragnarök starts, and they are not mentioned again. They don't seem to be mentioned at all in Vafþrúðnismál. Snorri does not provide more information. At a guess? Since we know ...


4

Yes. Heimdall and Loki slay one another. From the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturlson in the Gylfaginning Ch 16, emphasis mine: The Wolf shall swallow Odin; that shall be his ending But straight thereafter shall Vídarr stride forth and set one foot upon the lower jaw of the Wolf: on that foot he has the shoe, materials for which have been gathering ...


3

Loki isn't necessarily going without Iðunn's apples. Although it is not specified anywhere, it seems reasonable to assume that his wife Sigyn is feeding him. The Gylfaginning states that Loki's torment in the cave is lessened because: Sigyn, his wife, stands near him and holds a basin under the venom-drops; and when the basin is full, she goes and pours ...


3

The fate of the dwarves is one of the minor mysteries of Ragnarok. Volupsa doesn't mention them after v. 48, although to be fair it's mainly concerned with the few gods who survive. Snorri is more concerned with humans, as he tells us two will survive and repopulate the earth. The myths don't tell us what happens to the elves either. More mystery.


2

There is a common misconception that Ragnarok is the full end. But in all truth, Ragnarok is only the end of the gods or Twilight of the gods. And not even all of them. Mainly Tyr, Odin, Loki, Freyr, Heimdall, Thor, and most the gods on Asgard if not all. Mainly noted survivors will be 2 humans and Baldur, Magdi and Modi (sons of Thor) Vili Vey, many ...


2

Yes, there might be a chance that ragnarok has already happened and we are living in a repopulated world. But according to what I have read, ragnarok is a cycle that will always occur and replenish the old to make way for the new. So according to me, ragnarok will happen again but this time with new figures of worship.


2

As far as I know this heavily depends on whether you consider later additions to the mythology by Christian missionaries to be canon. The original idea was to describe the end of the world that hasn't happened similar to the Christian Revelation. Otherwise they'd worship dead gods, there'd be no Walhalla waiting, etc. which would basically screw up ...


1

In the Poetic Edda, it's clear that Loki is different from the Aesir. He descended from Ymir, whereas the Aesir did not. It's possible that his rules are different from the Aesir's, too. For example, he shape shifted into the female gender on several different occasions; whereas, the Aesir were never known to do that. It seemed likely that he went for ...


1

According to Snorri's texts, yes, but it is the only source of such a story. He says: "Loki á orrostu við Heimdall, ok verðr hvárr annars bani." My own translation: "Loki goes to battle against Heimdallr, and both cause death to each other." We don't know how much we can trust on Snorri's texts, since they were written long after the old norse ...


1

There are basically three places to go after you die: Valhalla: The Aesir paradise Vanaheim: The Vanir paradise Helheim: The common Hell The dead who die in glorious battle are sent to either Valhalla or Vahaheim (they are divided equally between the Aesir and the Vanir). There, they live in absolute Viking comfort, feasting and sparring, until Ragnarok, ...


1

It seems to me, as a student of mythology and an artist, that Ragnarök has indeed already happened. Yes the world is "destroyed", but it is then renewed and repopulated by humans. It seems quite clear we live in this post-apocalyptic, repopulated word sans Gods and Giants. But of course, this is a subjective take.


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