16

Short answer: Color signifies the property of the God's character. See this Mantra reference Long answer: Honestly, anything I write here would be a duplicate of this excellent answer on Hinduism.SE: Why are Hindu Gods colored?. I've made this answer community wiki as the content is not mine, so I don't deserve any rep from it. But at least this can be ...


14

According to Wikipedia, "the only general mythographical handbook to survive from Greek antiquity was the Library of Pseudo-Apollodorus." Also good to note, the work is incomplete. There are three (known) books fallling under this umbrella. A portion of the third volume has been lost. This site shows the chapters by text ending at Thesus, similar to the ...


12

As with anything in Hinduism, there is an overabundance of sources rather than a lack of one. Taking examples from just one text; Abirami Andhadhi, a poem on Abirami which is another name for Parvati (or Gauri, the consort of Shiva as mentioned in the other answer): The very first stanza of the poem describes the various similes to the red colour of the ...


11

I know one for certain, the pre-adamite Jinn in Islamic mythology. A Jinn is an invisible entity, created by God out of a "mixture of fire" or "smokeless fire", who roamed the earth before Adam. The community of the Jinn race were like those of humans, but then corruption and injustice among them increased and all warnings sent by God were ignored. ...


8

The term Anunnaki (alternate spellings: Anunnaku, Anunna, Anuna) is applied inconsistently, and the meaning appears to shift over time. It may be a term applied to a pantheon of the gods of the heavens and the underworld, or the term may be used to refer to the underworld gods only, or it may refer specifically to seven underworld judges, among others. The ...


7

Väinämöinen, in Finnish mythology, was the son of the Air Maiden, the creator goddess Ilmatar. Väinämöinen was born into a barren land where trees and plants had yet to grow, symbolizing the state of creation before the explosion of life (and the time after the glacial I’ve sheets receded in Northern Europe). He was a magical bard, not a god, but not ...


6

In essence God is formless, colourless, He is in everything and everything is with in Him. ( Refer to stanza 24 in Phalashruti) He lives in everything ( Search for 'Vyasa Uvacha:- Vasanad Vasudevasya vasitham bhuvana trayam, Sarva bhutha nivasosi vasudeva namosthuthe. Sri Vasudeva namosthuthe om nama ithi') Vishnu Sahasranaam Stotra : This stotra is the ...


5

Since demigods are allowed I propose Herakles (accidentally) killing Kheirôn/Chiron. Kheirôn was the immortal son of the Titan Kronos and therefore a half-brother of Zeus. When Herakles was battling members of the Kentauroi/Centaurs of Mount Pholoe he accidentally wounded Kheirôn. The problem was that the arrow that pierced Kheirôns was poisoned with Hydra ...


5

It's Pausanias 9.12.1&2 (the section on Boetia): The Thebans in ancient days used to sacrifice bulls to Apollo of the Ashes. Once when the festival was being held, the hour of the sacrifice was near but those sent to fetch the bull had not arrived. And so, as a wagon happened to be near by, they sacrificed to the god one of the oxen, and ever since it ...


4

Sadly, I've never been able to find any direct references to Mathonwy anywhere. Bromwich (pg. 439) mentions that the name Mathonwy itself could be a doublet for the name Math, like so many names in Culhwch ac Olwen are. If so, Mathonwy may never have represented a specific character. One final thing worth mentioning is that it's unclear whether Mathonwy ...


4

Because the internet hold a great deal of misinformation and disinformation, for obscure mythologies your best bet is scholarly work. (Folklorists and academic researchers.) Books You'll want to look for books on the subjects. Be cognizant of the author and their background, and the time period of the work. (Older anthropological work may not be current ...


4

The Sanskrit scriptures mentions the colour of the divine entities. Sri Hari was first golden colour, then white, then sky blue and dark. Siva is white Durga/Lalitha - red in colour (raktha varna) golden hued (swarn Ambika) Parvathy/Girija green in colour In essence God is formless, colourless, He is in everything and everything is with in Him. He lives ...


3

There's a nice little book by Malcolm Davies (St John's College, Oxford) titled "The Greek Epic Cycle", which deals exactly with what you are asking for. Here's the table of contents of the edition I have: The Epic Cycle The Titanomachy The Oedipodeia The Thebais The Epigoni The Cypria The Aethiopis The Little Iliad The Sack of Troy The Returns ...


3

Out of interest of spreading information, I'm copying here the answer I wrote yesterday to this question on Judaism.SE, with a few alterations: A possible answer: Maimonides on the mishnah states that this was done as part of worship of Baalim. The city of Baalbek, which was originally a Baal center of worship, eventually became a center of Bacchus (Dionysus ...


3

A friend of mine wrote to me that this is probably a reference to "Jove" which is another name for the Roman god Jupiter.


3

Try "Goetia" instead of "Goethia". Roughly, it means the art of summoning angels, whether fallen or still elevated (though more commonly the former). The Ars Goetia is the first section of The Lesser Key of Solomon. Basically, it lists the demons (with various titles of nobility and royalty) supposedly captured and bound by Solomon. Crowley and another ...


3

This falls under the the general field of Hermeneutics. Hermeneutics is the theory and methodology of interpretation, especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts. This can be applied to any text, and even into non-textual forms (visual media, such as movies.) Essentially, it's the idea that content can ...


3

It is quite well attested anciently. There is Book 9 Chapter 12 of Pausanias' Description of Greece (which you have already noted in your own Answer). Roughly contemporaneous with Pausanias is Apollodorus' Bibliotheka 3.4.1: When Telephassa died, Cadmus buried her, and after being hospitably received by the Thracians he came to Delphi to inquire ...


3

A few suggestions: The Structural Study of Myth (Levi-Strauss, 1955) Patterns in Comparative Folklore (Eliade, 1948) Sacred Narrative: Readings in the Theory of Myth (University of California Press, 1984) Creation Myths of the World (Encyclopedia, Two Volume)


2

According to Wikipedia, there was an Egyptian deity named Iabet, sometimes also known as Iab. If this is what Rabbi Ashenburg is referring to, then perhaps the story was that prior to arriving in Egypt, the sons of Jacob were only vaguely aware of the more major Egyptian deities and therefore Issachar saw nothing wrong with Yov. Upon arriving in Egypt and ...


2

I found an answer with regards to body colours of Lord Krishna here - http://www.iskcondesiretree.com/page/six-categories-of-avatars When He descends into the material world during different "yugas" or ages, He assumes 4 main colours. The Four yugas (Ages) come in cycles and are as follows: Satya yuga, lasting 1,728,000 years Treta yuga, lasting 1,296,000 ...


2

This is most likely a recent invention by Corgi breeders & enthusiasts. From "Did fairies really ride corgis?": The earliest source I can find is the poem "Corgi Fantasy" by Anne G. Biddlecombe of Dorset, England. She was one of the top Pembroke breeders of the 1940s and 1950s, and a founding member of the Welsh Corgi League in ...


2

No - this is a gross "gamification" of Qi to something similar like mana in other RPGs. You cannot "start with zero Qi" in Daoism, believed to be a vital force forming part of any living entity. Without Qi, you would be dead. Elemental travel is borrowed from 五行 (wuxing), in particular 形意拳 Xinq Yi Quan. It is a very common "...


2

Martin West's Loeb volume Greek Epic Fragments collects all the available fragments for the Titanomachy and a short introduction (2 paragraphs) on it. This is also where you'll find all the available fragments for early Greek epic.


2

There are literally hundreds of books on the topic, but the best one for serious work is Timothy Gantz's Early Greek Myth. This book goes through the earliest sources for the myths and chronicles their development over time. He even covers artistic representations. I would not necessarily call it an "introduction," as it is a proper academic ...


2

I'd posit: The Bull of Heaven Slain by Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh is a demigod, but very specifically mortal. Heracles, by contrast, is deified as an Olympian once he burns away his mortal flesh.


2

I have struggled to find a taxonomy of special stones or gems that takes the modern approach like a reference book. Under luminous gemstones there are part mythical part story works of scholarship. I haven't read any of these [obvious] but to me : Bencao Gangmu was a medical book in China in the late 1500's. So from that wikipedia entry: Compendium of ...


2

The Pahulu gods on Lanai, one of the Islands of Hawaii, were all killed by a prophet called Kaululaau. Since this myth is recorded only a few centuries ago from an oral tradtion, we don't know exactly how old it is, but it is possibly from as early as the first century CE.


2

The number seven is used in the Gilgamesh epos 40 times, so it seems more like a special connotation given to the number in general. Some examples: You have loved the lion tremendous in strength: seven pits you dug for him, and seven. You have loved the stallion magnificent in battle, and for him you decreed whip and spur and a thong, to gallop seven ...


2

This motif sounds a lot like the Bridge Chinvat, from Zoroastrian tradition and As-Sirat is Islamic. In those religions, upon the death of the body, a soul comes to a bridge which must be passed over. The good may pass over a broad bridge and come into paradise; the evil try to pass over a narrow bridge. There is certainly no official teaching of crossing ...


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